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Spirituality

Spirituality

  1. Standard member karoly aczel
    the Devil himself
    10 Jun '18 01:31
    I'm not a big bible reader however I've noticed 'Lord' come up more often than 'God'

    Anyone else want to re-concile their vocabulary or do we just assume 'Lord' means 'God' ?
  2. 10 Jun '18 01:40
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    I'm not a big bible reader however I've noticed 'Lord' come up more often than 'God'

    Anyone else want to re-concile their vocabulary or do we just assume 'Lord' means 'God' ?
    "Jesus is Lord"

    I see that phrase on churches.
  3. 10 Jun '18 01:50 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    I'm not a big bible reader however I've noticed 'Lord' come up more often than 'God'

    Anyone else want to re-concile their vocabulary or do we just assume 'Lord' means 'God' ?
    In the NT "Lord" means "master".

    Luke 6
    46“Why do you call Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ and do not do what I say? 47“Everyone who comes to Me and hears My words and acts on them, I will show you whom he is like: 48he is like a man building a house, who dug deep and laid a foundation on the rock; and when a flood occurred, the torrent burst against that house and could not shake it, because it had been well built. 49“But the one who has heard and has not acted accordingly, is like a man who built a house on the ground without any foundation; and the torrent burst against it and immediately it collapsed, and the ruin of that house was great.”

    Many Christians call Jesus "Lord", but do not believe that they actually have to do what He says to have "eternal life" / live in the "Kingdom".

    Matthew 7
    21“Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.
  4. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    10 Jun '18 02:45
    Originally posted by @thinkofone
    In the NT "Lord" means "master".

    [/b]
    Why isn't it "Master" in the translation then?

    May as well call him "Sausage" with a footnote saying sausage means master.
  5. 10 Jun '18 02:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    Why isn't it "Master" in the translation then?

    May as well call him "Sausage" with a footnote saying sausage means master.
    I really hope you're kidding.

    lord
    [lawrd]
    Word Origin
    See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
    noun
    1 a person who has authority, control, or power over others; a master, chief, or ruler.
    2 a person who exercises authority from property rights; an owner of land, houses, etc.
    3 a person who is a leader or has great influence in a chosen profession:

    http://www.dictionary.com/browse/lord
  6. Subscriber Tom Wolsey
    Aficionado of Prawns
    10 Jun '18 06:20
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    Why isn't it "Master" in the translation then?

    May as well call him "Sausage" with a footnote saying sausage means master.
    Sounds like a great icebreaker at the judgment seat of Christ.

    Lord: "And you, Wolfgang. What do you have to say about---
    Wolfgang: "What up, sausage!"
  7. 10 Jun '18 06:31
    https://www.blueletterbible.org/faq/don_stewart/don_stewart_1307.cfm

    “Summary

    The Greek word kurios has a number of different meanings. It can mean sir, master, owner, or even refer to an idol. However on a number of occasions it is the Greek equivalent to the Hebrew word Yahweh or Jehovah. This is the divine name for God. Jesus Christ is designated as the Lord in many New Testament references. This is the consistent truth of Scripture - Jesus is Yahweh or Jehovah.”
  8. 10 Jun '18 13:44 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by @js357
    https://www.blueletterbible.org/faq/don_stewart/don_stewart_1307.cfm

    “Summary

    The Greek word kurios has a number of different meanings. It can mean sir, master, owner, or even refer to an idol. However on a number of occasions it is the Greek equivalent to the Hebrew word Yahweh or Jehovah. This is the divine name for God. Jesus Christ is designated as ...[text shortened]... w Testament references. This is the consistent truth of Scripture - Jesus is Yahweh or Jehovah.”
    It can be very confusing to understand how the different titles used for God are used in the Bible. Part of the problem is that different Bible translations use the terms somewhat differently. The primary reason for the use of LORD in place of God's Hebrew name is to follow the tradition of the Israelites in not pronouncing or spelling out God's name. So, when God's Hebrew name "YHWH" is used in the Old Testament, English translations usually use "LORD" in all caps or small caps. Also, since ancient Hebrew did not use vowels in its written form, it is not entirely clear how God's name should be spelled or pronounced. It could be Yahweh, or Jehovah, or Yehowah, or something else.

    As stated above, when "LORD" in all caps or small caps occurs in the Old Testament, it is a replacement for an occurrence of God's Hebrew name "YHWH," also known as the Tetragrammaton. This is fairly consistent throughout all the different English translations of the Bible. When "Lord" occurs in the Old Testament, referring to God, it is usually a rendering of "Adonai," a name/title of God that emphasizes His lordship. LORD/YHWH and Lord/Adonai are by far the two most consistent renderings throughout all the different English Bible translations.

    In the Old Testament, when "God" is used, it is usually a rendering of the general Hebrew word for God, "Elohim." When "LORD GOD" or "Lord GOD" occurs, it is usually a rendering of a dual name for God "Adonai YHWH." The Hebrew term "YHWH Sabaoth" is usually rendered "Lord of Hosts." The Hebrew term "YHWH Shaddai" is usually rendered "LORD Almighty." The Old Testament uses many different names and titles to refer to God, to emphasize certain aspects of His person and attributes. This can result in confusion in translation, but in the original Hebrew, it was done entirely in an effort to glorify and magnify God's name.

    The usage of "Lord" and "God" in the New Testament is much less complicated. Almost universally, "God" is a translation of "theos," the general Greek word for deity. Also almost universally, "Lord" is a translation of "kurios," the general Greek word for a master. The key point in all of this is that whether we use His actual Hebrew name, or refer to Him as God, or Lord, or Lord God, we are to always show reverence to Him and His name.

    https://www.gotquestions.org/LORD-GOD-Lord-God.html


    While gotquestions is generally a really dubious source, their take on this particular issue is reasonable enough.

    Jesus Christ is designated as the Lord in many New Testament references. This is the consistent truth of Scripture - Jesus is Yahweh or Jehovah.”

    "...consistent truth of Scripture - Jesus is Yahweh or Jehovah". What delusional nonsense. In the gospel preached by Jesus during His ministry, He most strongly indicates otherwise. But then, Christianity has little to do with the gospel preached by Jesus during His ministry.
  9. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    10 Jun '18 19:43
    Originally posted by @thinkofone
    I really hope you're kidding.

    OK.
    Mister Sausage
  10. Subscriber Tom Wolsey
    Aficionado of Prawns
    10 Jun '18 19:49
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    OK.
    [b]Mister
    Sausage[/b]
    Did you ever see this. The one and only memorable scene in the movie.

    Liberal 30 year old, still living at home, with a right wing dad. What could go wrong?

    YouTube : FGF
  11. Standard member KellyJay
    Walk your Faith
    10 Jun '18 22:08
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    I'm not a big bible reader however I've noticed 'Lord' come up more often than 'God'

    Anyone else want to re-concile their vocabulary or do we just assume 'Lord' means 'God' ?
    You can be a Lord without being God, and I imagine combining the two words turned the meaning into something in a polytheistic world that had greater meaning than just Lord or just god/God.
  12. Standard member karoly aczel
    the Devil himself
    10 Jun '18 23:50
    Originally posted by @chaney3
    "Jesus is Lord"

    I see that phrase on churches.
    Yes, that is also problematic
  13. Standard member karoly aczel
    the Devil himself
    10 Jun '18 23:59
    Originally posted by @kellyjay
    You can be a Lord without being God, and I imagine combining the two words turned the meaning into something in a polytheistic world that had greater meaning than just Lord or just god/God.
    Hmmm

    I'm pretty sure there is only one Lord reffered to in the bible. Sometimes 'LordGod'

    Anyway who judges us? Who forgives ? Who releases us from depression? Who understands our heart? You do. You are God. No intervention between you and your eternal nature from the Lord.
  14. Standard member KellyJay
    Walk your Faith
    11 Jun '18 01:15
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    Hmmm

    I'm pretty sure there is only one Lord reffered to in the bible. Sometimes 'LordGod'

    Anyway who judges us? Who forgives ? Who releases us from depression? Who understands our heart? You do. You are God. No intervention between you and your eternal nature from the Lord.
    For those who read scripture and were familiar with it had no issues knowing that there was and is just One God. That was not true for the nations around them or the back sliding people of that time who kept going back to other gods!
  15. Standard member karoly aczel
    the Devil himself
    11 Jun '18 02:35
    Originally posted by @kellyjay
    For those who read scripture and were familiar with it had no issues knowing that there was and is just One God. That was not true for the nations around them or the back sliding people of that time who kept going back to other gods!
    This is where metaphor kicks in.