1. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 15:36
    For many, one's moral compass is their faith. For others a moral compass is values that are passed down from parents, grandparents, etc. (which may be faith based or not). Still others, a moral compass is more culturally based, or what is based on the given law were one lives. What do you claim to be your moral compass, is it any of the above or something else?
  2. Standard memberRemoved
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    01 Jan '13 16:07
    Originally posted by kd2acz
    For many, one's moral compass is their faith. For others a moral compass is values that are passed down from parents, grandparents, etc. (which may be faith based or not). Still others, a moral compass is more culturally based, or what is based on the given law were one lives. What do you claim to be your moral compass, is it any of the above or something else?
    The Word of God...WWJD.
  3. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 16:15
    Originally posted by kd2acz
    For many, one's moral compass is their faith. For others a moral compass is values that are passed down from parents, grandparents, etc. (which may be faith based or not). Still others, a moral compass is more culturally based, or what is based on the given law were one lives. What do you claim to be your moral compass, is it any of the above or something else?
    Most do have some level of a moral compass in their hearts but it all depends on many factors such as what their parents have instilled in them by teaching, reasoning, and by example as children.
    But without the Bibles many teachings and the reasons behind those teachings which are shown by examples of how it affects not only our relationships with other humans but more importantly ones relationship with God, it is at times a hard issue to teach and make it something that really has positive affects on our hearts especially with worldy attitudes that are negative to that moral compass.
  4. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 17:12
    Originally posted by kd2acz
    For many, one's moral compass is their faith. For others a moral compass is values that are passed down from parents, grandparents, etc. (which may be faith based or not). Still others, a moral compass is more culturally based, or what is based on the given law were one lives. What do you claim to be your moral compass, is it any of the above or something else?
    Morality is for me, entirely social. My moral compass is how I want to be thought of and remembered by people I love and respect. Obviously this is a social context; with concentric circles extending outward, the most important being family and friends. In terms of east and west, this is more of an esteem/shame based compass, than it is sin/guilt based. If I was a person of faith I would say that it is more likely that God has established our moral conscience in this way, reaching out to us through our fellow beings.
  5. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 17:18
    Originally posted by JS357
    Morality is for me, entirely social. My moral compass is how I want to be thought of and remembered by people I love and respect. Obviously this is a social context; with concentric circles extending outward, the most important being family and friends. In terms of east and west, this is more of an esteem/shame based compass, than it is sin/guilt based. If I ...[text shortened]... has established our moral conscience in this way, reaching out to us through our fellow beings.
    So what drives yours, is it laws, bible, inheritance... what is your input?
  6. Standard memberRJHinds
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    01 Jan '13 17:55
    Originally posted by galveston75
    Most do have some level of a moral compass in their hearts but it all depends on many factors such as what their parents have instilled in them by teaching, reasoning, and by example as children.
    But without the Bibles many teachings and the reasons behind those teachings which are shown by examples of how it affects not only our relationships with oth ...[text shortened]... affects on our hearts especially with worldy attitudes that are negative to that moral compass.
    I agree. The strong effort made by the atheists to push God out of our government and our schools has made the moral behavior of our citizens very bad. This nation is headed for the garbage heap unless strong efforts are made to bring God back into the lives of the people. Any good moral compass must include a belief in God and His Christ and the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

    HalleluYah !!! Praise the Lord! Holy! Holy! Holy!
  7. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 18:32
    Originally posted by kd2acz
    So what drives yours, is it laws, bible, inheritance... what is your input?
    My input of course was my parents and schooling when I was little, and since then it has been other teachers, and how things have gone for me and others who have made decisions of a moral kind.

    Funny you should ask. I am now listening to a DVD series on Greek history by J. Rufus Fears. He says that the historians Heredotus and Thucycides had, as the basis of their writings, moral lessons, mostly about hubris (hybris).

    If you are interested in this source, I suggest you look at Fears' obituary to see if he is the kind of person whose writings and especially videos, would interest you.
    http://www.ou.edu/cas/classics/people/fears/inmemoriamjrf.html

    Also here is a taste of his style:
    YouTube
  8. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 18:53
    Originally posted by kd2acz
    For many, one's moral compass is their faith. For others a moral compass is values that are passed down from parents, grandparents, etc. (which may be faith based or not). Still others, a moral compass is more culturally based, or what is based on the given law were one lives. What do you claim to be your moral compass, is it any of the above or something else?
    On the whole, do you believe that Christians have a truer "moral compass" than non-Christians?

    On the whole, do you believe that Christians have a stronger "moral compass" than non-Christians?
  9. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 20:10
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    On the whole, do you believe that Christians have a truer "moral compass" than non-Christians?

    On the whole, do you believe that Christians have a stronger "moral compass" than non-Christians?
    If you were asking me I would say the "truth" of a moral compass is not a measure of its value, because its tenets are statements of "ought" or "ought not," not statements of "is" or "is not." This in spite of the ability to use "is" as in "it is right to..." and make it sound like a true/false statement.

    I think blanket comparisons like of strength -- however it is measured -- take us into old arguments that never get anywhere new. But I would like to be wrong on this.
  10. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 20:414 edits
    Originally posted by JS357
    If you were asking me I would say the "truth" of a moral compass is not a measure of its value, because its tenets are statements of "ought" or "ought not," not statements of "is" or "is not." This in spite of the ability to use "is" as in "it is right to..." and make it sound like a true/false statement.

    I think blanket comparisons like of strength -- howe ...[text shortened]... o old arguments that never get anywhere new. But I would like to be wrong on this.
    If you were asking me I would say the "truth" of a moral compass is not a measure of its value, because its tenets are statements of "ought" or "ought not," not statements of "is" or "is not." This in spite of the ability to use "is" as in "it is right to..." and make it sound like a true/false statement.

    Not sure what your point is, but I'll assume you are trying to get at the idea of "absolute truth" and that you do not believe in this.

    IIRC Kd2 is a Christian. From what I've seen, the vast majority of Christians believe in an "absolute truth" as do I. If Kd2 does believe in an "absolute truth", then the question should have meaning for him.

    I think blanket comparisons like of strength -- however it is measured -- take us into old arguments that never get anywhere new. But I would like to be wrong on this.

    Not sure what your objection is here.

    What I was trying to get at here is the impact ones "moral compass" has on ones actions. For example, an individual's "moral compass" may tell them that infidelity in marriage is wrong, yet they may not adhere to it if it is "weak". Those with a "strong" moral compass would adhere to it.
  11. Joined
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    01 Jan '13 20:54
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    [b]If you were asking me I would say the "truth" of a moral compass is not a measure of its value, because its tenets are statements of "ought" or "ought not," not statements of "is" or "is not." This in spite of the ability to use "is" as in "it is right to..." and make it sound like a true/false statement.

    Not sure what your point is, but I'll as ...[text shortened]... s "weak". Those with a "strong" moral compass would adhere to it.[/b]
    OK I'll sit back and watch more football. Maybe further comments later.
  12. Melbourne, Australia
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    01 Jan '13 23:052 edits
    One's moral compass is finally a choice of the mind, from learning, religious or philosophical thought, etc. in a situation. It seems to me to build character upon certain adopted virtues so that in situations you respond out of a built habit will enable better spontaneous responses. I think one needs to adopt certain guidelines to practice and follow. Rigidity in excessive moralistic attitude in changing human circumstances has ended up being immoral also.

    I find simply saying following "the Word of God" is not a suficient answer, as it is clearly apparent from the range of immoral to moral actions and teachings found there, individuals must still make a choice. Its too vague.
    Following "the Word of God" has meant in different places and times supporting slavery, child abuse (Dickensian England for one), encouraging poverty and destitution, the denigration of women, the ostracizing and murder of people with differing sexual preferences, and indeed any who dared appeared to practice freedom of thought, torture and massacres, as well as all the good stuff of love and charity of peacefulness and humanitarian attitudes.

    The cardinal virtues are one set of general guidelines that have served humans well and still do.

    "The cardinal virtues are a set of four virtues recognized in the writings of Classical Antiquity and, along with the theological virtues, also in Christian tradition. They consist of:

    Prudence - able to judge between actions with regard to appropriate actions at a given time
    Justice - the perpetual and constant will of rendering to each one his right
    Temperance or Restraint - practicing self-control, abstention, and moderation; tempering the appetition
    Fortitude or Courage - forbearance, endurance, and ability to confront fear, uncertainty and intimidation

    ...The term "cardinal" comes from the Latin cardo or hinge; the cardinal virtues are so called because they are hinges upon which the door of the moral life swings."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardinal_virtues (excerpt)
  13. Standard memberRemoved
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    01 Jan '13 23:40
    Originally posted by Taoman
    One's moral compass is finally a choice of the mind, from learning, religious or philosophical thought, etc. in a situation. It seems to me to build character upon certain adopted virtues so that in situations you respond out of a built habit will enable better spontaneous responses. I think one needs to adopt certain guidelines to practice and follow. Rigidi ...[text shortened]... r of the moral life swings."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardinal_virtues (excerpt)
    I understand your contempt for slavery, killing people because of sexual preference, etc., and I assume you refer to the Old Testament where some of these practices occurred under the command of God Himself. However you miss the definition of a greater love than you can fathom. Many of the slaves by the way were (Dulos) and chose to stay with their masters even after being set free. The sexual sin is a heinous act that required death. You do not understand the spiritual implications and the demonic activity in those cases, neither would I expect you to.
    God wanted His people free from sin and I liken it to cancer. If a doctor cuts out a cancer from your body, it is a good thing. You are looking from a sensual or physical perspective. God is love and in Him is no darkness(evil) at all.
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    02 Jan '13 00:191 edit
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    I understand your contempt for slavery, killing people because of sexual preference, etc., and I assume you refer to the Old Testament where some of these practices occurred under the command of God Himself. However you miss the definition of a greater love than you can fathom. Many of the slaves by the way were (Dulos) and chose to stay with their mast ...[text shortened]... king from a sensual or physical perspective. God is love and in Him is no darkness(evil) at all.
    So how exactly does God's condoning slavery and the beating of slaves (even to death) fit in with what you've written here?
  15. Joined
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    02 Jan '13 00:32
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    The Word of God...WWJD.
    "WWJD"

    What kind of lame juvenile hipster-speak is this?
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