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  1. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    19 Nov '13 23:30
    I kind of feel bad for the White House these days. You throw your whole legacy and the entire weight of your power into a single idea and the rollout is becoming a disaster that is beyond Ann Coulter's wildest wet dreams.

    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/19/woman-cited-by-president-as-obamacare-success-story-frustrated-by-sign-up-process/

    Washington state resident Jessica Sanford was bursting with pride when President Obama mentioned her story during a Rose Garden event on health care reform last month at the White House.

    "Who wouldn't?" Sanford asks. "I'm a nobody really to have him mention my story."

    Back in October, Sanford had written a letter to the White House to share her good news. The 48-year-old single mother of a teenage son diagnosed with ADHD had just purchased what she considered to be affordable insurance on the Washington state exchange.

    "I was ecstatic. I couldn't wait to call the doctor for an appointment on January 2nd," Sanford told CNN about the feeling she had when she first enrolled.

    Her heartfelt letter made it to the President's hands and then into his October 21 speech.

    "'I was crying the other day when I signed up. So much stress lifted.'" Obama said, reading from Sanford's letter.

    The president said Sanford's story was proof, despite the technical problems with the healthcare.gov website, that the Affordable Care Act was working.

    "That's what the Affordable Care Act is all about. The point is, the essence of the law - the health insurance that's available to people - is working just fine," Obama said.

    But then, after Obama mentioned her story, Sanford started having problems. Sanford said she received another letter informing her the Washington state health exchange had miscalculated her eligibility for a tax credit.

    In other words, her monthly insurance bill had shot up from $198 a month (she had initially said $169 a month to the White House but she switched plans) to $280 a month for the same "gold" plan offered by the state exchange.

    Sanford said she was frustrated with the state's error. But she decided to purchase the new plan and thought everything was fine.

    It wasn't fine. Last week, Sanford received another letter from the Washington state exchange, stating there had been another problem, a "system error" that resulted in some "applicants to qualify for higher than allowed health insurance premium tax credits."

    The letter said the state exchange was "disappointed to have discovered this issue" and apologized.

    The result was a higher quote, which Sanford said was for $390 per month for a "silver" plan with a higher deductible. Still too expensive

    A cheaper "bronze" plan, Sanford said, came in at $324 per month, but also with a high deductible - also not in her budget.

    Then another letter from the state exchange with even worse news.

    "Your household has been determined eligible for a Federal Tax Credit of $0.00 to help cover the cost of your monthly health insurance premium payments," the latest letter said.

    "I had a good cry," Sanford said about her reaction to the latest news from the state.

    As a self-employed court reporter, the new quote was simply out of her range.

    "This is it. I'm not getting insurance," Sanford told CNN. "That's where it stands right now unless they fix it."

    Sanford, an Obama supporter who voted for the president twice, is careful to say she blames the state of Washington's online marketplace for the mixed signals and not the White House.

    She is sorry Obama mentioned her during the October 21 speech.

    "I feel awful about it. I support (the Affordable Care Act)," Sanford said.

    But the messy rollout in the other Washington, the nation's capital, was not far from her mind.

    "What the hell? Why is it the same story as the federal government?" Sanford says in disgust with the Washington state exchange. "They didn't have it ready."

    "They screwed up," she added.

    Sanford reiterated her frustration in a post to the Washington HealthPlanFinder's Facebook page last Friday.

    "Wow. You guys really screwed me over," Sanford wrote. "Now I have been priced out and will not be able to afford the plans you offer. But, I get to pay $95 and up for not having health insurance. I am so incredibly disappointed and saddened. You majorly screwed up."

    In response, a HealthplanFinder posting tried to direct Sanford to a broker for help.

    "Jessica, we are very sad and disappointed that the tax credit miscalculation affected you so heavily," the comment read, suggesting she try to find a new plan on the site. Sanford responded on Facebook the issue was affordability.

    Bethany Frey, a spokeswoman for Washington HealthPlanFinder told CNN on Monday night, "I'm already looking into this with our client specialist team. I'll let you know what I hear."
  2. 20 Nov '13 00:59
    Originally posted by sh76
    I kind of feel bad for the White House these days. You throw your whole legacy and the entire weight of your power into a single idea and the rollout is becoming a disaster that is beyond Ann Coulter's wildest wet dreams.

    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/19/woman-cited-by-president-as-obamacare-success-story-frustrated-by-sign-up-process/

    [quo ...[text shortened]... ready looking into this with our client specialist team. I'll let you know what I hear."[/quote]
    And to think that a month ago, they could have postponed it all a year or forever, and blamed Republicans?
  3. 20 Nov '13 01:27
    Originally posted by sh76
    I kind of feel bad for the White House these days. You throw your whole legacy and the entire weight of your power into a single idea and the rollout is becoming a disaster that is beyond Ann Coulter's wildest wet dreams.

    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/19/woman-cited-by-president-as-obamacare-success-story-frustrated-by-sign-up-process/

    [quo ...[text shortened]... ready looking into this with our client specialist team. I'll let you know what I hear."[/quote]
    It is interesting to me that there has not been blame on the software writers yet. It would be easy to save face by blaming it all on sabotage. They must still have plans to go forward with it and need the techs to fix the thing.
  4. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    20 Nov '13 01:42
    Originally posted by joe beyser
    It is interesting to me that there has not been blame on the software writers yet. It would be easy to save face by blaming it all on sabotage. They must still have plans to go forward with it and need the techs to fix the thing.
    I don't think the IT is the biggest issue. The biggest issue is individuals and small business losing their policies because of the regulations and that has nothing to do with exchanges or the site.
  5. 20 Nov '13 01:56
    Originally posted by sh76
    I don't think the IT is the biggest issue. The biggest issue is individuals and small business losing their policies because of the regulations and that has nothing to do with exchanges or the site.
    Yes I agree with that but the average Joe can probably be led to believe even that has to do with the software. This whole thing is still shocking to me. Small business has a hard enough time as it is without all this.
  6. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    20 Nov '13 02:07
    Originally posted by sh76
    I kind of feel bad for the White House these days. You throw your whole legacy and the entire weight of your power into a single idea and the rollout is becoming a disaster that is beyond Ann Coulter's wildest wet dreams.

    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/19/woman-cited-by-president-as-obamacare-success-story-frustrated-by-sign-up-process/

    [quo ...[text shortened]... ready looking into this with our client specialist team. I'll let you know what I hear."[/quote]
    I so don't feel bad for the White House. I hope this costs them the Senate, full repeal of Obamacare, and impeachment. Not realistic, but a guy can dream.
  7. 20 Nov '13 04:05 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sh76
    I kind of feel bad for the White House these days. You throw your whole legacy and the entire weight of your power into a single idea and the rollout is becoming a disaster that is beyond Ann Coulter's wildest wet dreams.

    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/19/woman-cited-by-president-as-obamacare-success-story-frustrated-by-sign-up-process/

    [quo ...[text shortened]... ready looking into this with our client specialist team. I'll let you know what I hear."[/quote]
    I just read in a hearing involving the House Energy Committee hearing that a senior official involved in constructing the health insurance exchange system admitted that a large portion of the system has not even been built yet.

    Just out of curiosity, would it be possible to sue the government for mandating that we buy something that they can't even provide us?

    Also, what about the possibility of civil suits against lying politicians who imposed this on us all?

    I know its a pipe dream, but theoretically could this happen?
  8. 20 Nov '13 04:06
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just read in a hearing involving the House Energy Committee hearing that a senior official involved in constructing the health insurance exchange system admitted that a large portion of the system has not even been built yet.

    Just out of curiosity, would it be possible to sue the government for mandating that we buy something that they can't even provide ...[text shortened]... ans who imposed this on us all?

    I know its a pipe dream, but theoretically could this happen?
    Who would allow it?
  9. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    20 Nov '13 04:17
    Originally posted by joe beyser
    It is interesting to me that there has not been blame on the software writers yet. It would be easy to save face by blaming it all on sabotage. They must still have plans to go forward with it and need the techs to fix the thing.
    The gig is up on that. Somehow, the NBCs and CBSs of the world finally had enough. Everybody is now reporting that the flaw is with the law itself. No wriggling out of this one.
  10. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    20 Nov '13 04:19
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    I so don't feel bad for the White House. I hope this costs them the Senate, full repeal of Obamacare, and impeachment. Not realistic, but a guy can dream.
  11. 20 Nov '13 04:39
    Originally posted by joe beyser
    Who would allow it?
    I just want to know if it's possible. I realize that we live in tyranny and have no recourse.
  12. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    20 Nov '13 05:43
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just read in a hearing involving the House Energy Committee hearing that a senior official involved in constructing the health insurance exchange system admitted that a large portion of the system has not even been built yet.

    Just out of curiosity, would it be possible to sue the government for mandating that we buy something that they can't even provide ...[text shortened]... ans who imposed this on us all?

    I know its a pipe dream, but theoretically could this happen?
    I watched that on CSPAN. He said the front end, i.e. the user interface, is working, but that the back end, and specifically the payment system isn't even built yet. That seems like a very important bit to leave until last. We are being governed by clowns.
  13. 20 Nov '13 10:09
    Originally posted by joe beyser
    It is interesting to me that there has not been blame on the software writers yet. It would be easy to save face by blaming it all on sabotage. They must still have plans to go forward with it and need the techs to fix the thing.
    it seems that indeed it was bad coding, lack of rigorous testing and a lack of transparency on what the technical problems were, these are inexcusable in this day. I suspect the apparent complexity of integrating the public with the government system and the government with insurers systems has proven difficult, why it should be the case is hard to say, perhaps those who have been able to sign up for it can say if their experience was easy or troublesome, either way, to 'go live', knowing that this would create the problems that it has is unacceptable and the people responsible should be fired and new contractors brought in to fix the problems, which i suspect has already happened.

    Dont you find it amazing that despite the republican opposition and their petty government shut-down and the technical glitches that the ACA has managed to survive, I do, its nothing short of miraculous.
  14. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    20 Nov '13 10:30
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    it seems that indeed it was bad coding, lack of rigorous testing and a lack of transparency on what the technical problems were, these are inexcusable in this day. I suspect the apparent complexity of integrating the public with the government system and the government with insurers systems has proven difficult, why it should be the case is hard to ...[text shortened]... e technical glitches that the ACA has managed to survive, I do, its nothing short of miraculous.
    Robbie, I don't think you've read up on the content of the law itself. Do you know what it says? Do you know the premise on which it is based? Do you understand that, at least in the short- to medium-term, Obamacare is going to result in millions of people actually losing their insurance?

    I think you should inform yourself more. Republicans voted to fully fund government with the exception of Obamacare. Obama was the individual willing to take the government over the abyss for his law. Republicans wanted to delay the law, Obama said no - and then all this happens! Republicans were tossing a obama a lifeline he desperately needed and he threw it back. Honestly Robbie, I've never seen anything like it - a Chief Executive slitting his own throat.
  15. 20 Nov '13 12:28
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    it seems that indeed it was bad coding, lack of rigorous testing and a lack of transparency on what the technical problems were, these are inexcusable in this day. I suspect the apparent complexity of integrating the public with the government system and the government with insurers systems has proven difficult, why it should be the case is hard to ...[text shortened]... e technical glitches that the ACA has managed to survive, I do, its nothing short of miraculous.
    I do believe there is a mandate to roll our the ACA no matter what. The effects on peoples insurance plans is actually going quite smoothly for the insurance companies. This was what was really intended after all. The sign up was something to collect names and addresses and get a data base of those not on insurance.