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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    15 May '09 11:50
    "If you wonder what has happened to al-Qaida, follow the trail of Arab and Muslim public opinion, and you'll get a clear picture of its massive crisis of authority and legitimacy.

    The balance of forces in the world of Islam has shifted dramatically against al-Qaida's global jihad and its local manifestations."
    http://www.opendemocracy.net/article/al-qaida-today-the-fate-of-a-movement
  2. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 May '09 12:09 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    "If you wonder what has happened to al-Qaida, follow the trail of Arab and Muslim public opinion, and you'll get a clear picture of its massive crisis of authority and legitimacy. The balance of forces in the world of Islam has shifted dramatically against al-Qaida's global jihad and its local manifestations."
    Al Qaeda always fell foul of 'Muslim public opinion' here in the world's largest Muslim country. From the average Indonesian's vantage point, Al Qaeda's "global jihad" never had any legitimacy.
  3. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    15 May '09 12:19
    Originally posted by FMF
    Al Qaeda always fell foul of 'Muslim public opinion' here in the world's largest Muslim country. From the average Indonesian's vantage point, Al Qaeda's "global jihad" never had an legitimacy.
    "Militants of all stripes whom I have interviewed, particularly repentant jihadis, know they are at a crossroads. At home and abroad they are blamed for unleashing the wrath of the United States against the umma (the global Muslim community). Most of their allies have deserted them; clerics and Muslim opinion scorn them. Only a miracle will resuscitate global jihad. The question is whether America's "long war" will lead to circumstances - such as a destabilised Pakistan or an escalation of Arab-Israeli hostilities - that become such a miracle."
  4. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 May '09 12:33
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    "At home and abroad [jihadis] are blamed for unleashing the wrath of the United States against the [...] global Muslim community. "
    I would say that the United States is also blamed, here, for unleashing the wrath of the United States against the global Muslim community.
  5. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    15 May '09 12:46
    Originally posted by FMF
    I would say that the United States is also blamed, here, for unleashing the wrath of the United States against the global Muslim community.
    Indisputably.
  6. 15 May '09 15:19
    i heard a commentator on bbc radio today saying that islam is not compatible with modern western democracy. he went on to say that islam is going to have to undergo a major change if it is to again become a positive creative force in the world.
    although i am just a casual observer it sounded about right to me.
  7. 15 May '09 15:35
    Originally posted by FMF
    Al Qaeda always fell foul of 'Muslim public opinion' here in the world's largest Muslim country. From the average Indonesian's vantage point, Al Qaeda's "global jihad" never had any legitimacy.
    From the average Indonesian's vantage point, Al Qaeda's "global jihad" never had any legitimacy.

    that's really surprising.

    are they saying that because they always believed it, or because Al-qaeda is losing now?
  8. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 May '09 22:56 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    [b]From the average Indonesian's vantage point, Al Qaeda's "global jihad" never had any legitimacy.

    that's really surprising.[/b]
    Oh? I've been saying this here since at least "30 May '07". Why do you suddenly say it's surprising (to me) on "15 May '09"?
  9. 16 May '09 00:23
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    "If you wonder what has happened to al-Qaida, follow the trail of Arab and Muslim public opinion, and you'll get a clear picture of its massive crisis of authority and legitimacy.

    The balance of forces in the world of Islam has shifted dramatically against al-Qaida's global jihad and its local manifestations."
    http://www.opendemocracy.net/article/al-qaida-today-the-fate-of-a-movement
    Are you implying that it ever had the support of Muslims generally?