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Debates Forum

  1. 24 Oct '10 14:31 / 1 edit
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101023/ap_on_el_ge/us_congress_palace_intrigue

    Change at the top? Not necessarily. Whichever party controls the House and Senate after the Nov 2 election probably will install the same leaders whose policymaking helped bring about the sour economy, nearly double-digit unemployment and deficit spending that has led voters to call for fresh faces.

    Different lineups could mean different fates for health care, taxation, government spending and regulation, evergy and foriegn policy, and President Barak Obama's bid for a second term.

    The newly elected, no matter how big their freshman class, will have to wait for power. At most, they may get junior leadership seats in each chamber as a symbolic gesture to the populist wave they rode on, lawmakers and congressional officials said.

    Democrats would have to find a new leader to run the Senate if they keep their majority but Harry Reid loses to tea party favorite Sharron Angle in Nevada. Little more than a week to the election, their race is a toss-up.

    The last time voters turned out a sitting party leader in the Senate was in 2004 when Democrat Tom Daschle of South Dekota lost to Republican Sen. John Thune.

    If Republicans make good on what's widely seen as a House majority for the taking, the new speaker is almost certain to be Rep. John Boehner of Ohio. The 60 year old has been in charge of the House Republicans since the last two years of George Bush's presidency. Democrats have spent the campaign season portraying him as Bush redux.

    Should the GOP fall short, Republicans may look to a new slate of self described "young guns" who are more strident in many of their views than Boehner. They include current Rep Eric Cantor of Virginia, the second ranking Republican; Wisconsin's Paul Ryan, a fiscal conservative who came close to derailing Bush's $700 billion bank bailout; and Kevin McCarthy of California, who after only two years in Congress took charge of recruiting the party's field of House candidates this year.

    The three make few bones about their ambitions. They even wrote a book about how they would run the House in a post-Boehner era. Attending the book party earlier this fall, Boehner served up a reality check of sorts: That particular kind of change is not at hand.

    "The three of them know tha my job is to make sure that they are well qualified and ready to take my place," Boehner said with a semiserious grin, "at the appropriate time".

    Indeed, if that moment comes anytime soon, it will most likely be because the Republicans failed to win the majority in November.

    In that less-likely scenerio, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, probably would keep her post as second in the line of succession to the Presidency, even after being vilified by Republicans throughout this election season as the face of Washington establishment.

    Retain or lose the majority, Pelosi, 70, faces a far less appealing job as leader of a smaller caucus. Publicly, she has refused to entertain the notion that she will return in any less role than as speaker.

    No one has stepped forward to challenge her or her lietuenant, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland, another "old bull" whith 30 years in the House. It is uncertain whether Pelosi would want to head her party as minority leader, a job she held four years during Bush's presidency, or for how long.

    A few conservative Democrats in difficult re-election fights have said they would not vote for her again to lead the party. More have said they would consider voting for others. That could pose a challenge for Pelosi if Democrats emerge from the election still holding a narrow majority. But Pelosi carried her caucus unanimously in the last two elections for speaker.

    In the Senate, look for two of Reid's lietuenants to compete to succeed him as the Democrats' leader should he lose to Angle. They are third term Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, an unabashed liberal and genial and experienced vote wrangler, and Sen. Chuck U Schumer of New York, a scrappy and prescient dealmaker.

    On the Republican side, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky assembled enough votes months ago to retain his position as head of what is sure to be a bigger and feistier GOP caucus. McConnell won a promise from South Carolina Sen Jim DeMint not to challenge him.

    But DeMint's support for anti-GOP establishment candidates, some of them tea partiers, in several primaries position him to become a de-facto leader of the Senate GOP's more conservative wing.

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    Specifically I would like to address the notion that John Boehner will become House Speaker if the Republicans take it back. Taking back the House from the radical spending Democrats will be the easy part, but returning it to someone who wants to return to "W" spending levels is not acceptable. If it were me and I were running against Mr. Boehner as a "Tea Partier", I would be campaigning against Mr. Boehner with the caption, "Vote for an extremist like me who wishes to return to Clinton era government spending." Of course, it pains me enough to even utter "Clinton era government spending", but at least it is a start. To think that returning to Bush-like spending levels is now a moderate position is mind blowing. Granted, it is a moderate position to what we have now.

    I suppose my biggest fear here is that Mr. Boehner is a firmly entriched career politician who will help destroy the Republican party once again with another Bush redux. Make no mistake, if that happens and the Tea Party does not respond the Tea Party is over!!
  2. 24 Oct '10 16:49
    If the GOP takes the House, the deficit will explode. Outside of NPR, their talking heads and leaders admit to no program that they would cut, this while having tax cuts. This comeback may be short lived.

    If nothing else let's see a future 3rd party that is fiscally conservative and socially liberal.
  3. 24 Oct '10 17:16 / 1 edit
    The rise of tea party-endorsed candidates suffices as a good reason why the right to vote should be reserved to those who are intelligent enough to use it wisely.
  4. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    24 Oct '10 17:24
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    the right to vote should be reserved to those are intelligent enough to use it wisely.
    Another right bites the dust for "center-right conservative" generalissimo. The statist disease has consumed him completely.
  5. 24 Oct '10 17:32
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Another right bites the dust for "center-right conservative" generalissimo. The statist disease has consumed him completely.
    Indeed, and Im sure you know Im also going to reconsider other rights too.

    Perhaps I really should update my profile, how about "evil far-left progressive", is that an accurate description in your point of view?

  6. 24 Oct '10 17:44
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    The rise of tea party-endorsed candidates suffices as a good reason why the right to vote should be reserved to those who are intelligent enough to use it wisely.
    That would be the end of the GOP.
  7. 24 Oct '10 18:38
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101023/ap_on_el_ge/us_congress_palace_intrigue

    Change at the top? Not necessarily. Whichever party controls the House and Senate after the Nov 2 election probably will install the same leaders whose policymaking helped bring about the sour economy, nearly double-digit unemployment and deficit spending that has led voters to c ...[text shortened]... appens and the Tea Party does not respond the Tea Party is over!!
    Bye bye, Tea Party.
  8. 24 Oct '10 21:51
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Another right bites the dust for "center-right conservative" generalissimo. The statist disease has consumed him completely.
    It's kind of possible that he was joking, isn't it?
  9. 24 Oct '10 23:24
    Originally posted by badmoon
    That would be the end of the GOP.
    No, it would probably mark the end of the Tea Party participation in the Republican party, however.
  10. 24 Oct '10 23:24
    Originally posted by TerrierJack
    Bye bye, Tea Party.
    Where are we going to go?
  11. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    25 Oct '10 00:54
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    It's kind of possible that he was joking, isn't it?
    It's getting harder and harder to tell.
  12. 25 Oct '10 14:12
    Originally posted by whodey
    Where are we going to go?
    You're going to go where people are willing to actually propose real specific tangible things - so you can then demand that people in Congress do these things. An example of this is the Esquire Commission (made up of 4 ex-senators).

    I started a thread about the Esquire Commission's proposal for balancing the budget by 2020. The plan does include some tax increases, but the main focus is on spending cuts.

    Perhaps you'd like to comment on it and help them get the ball rolling towards a true movement that offers specific proposals aimed at balancing the budget and reducing government spending. I'm sure there's stuff in there that you disagree with - so you can offer your ideas for improving it.
  13. 25 Oct '10 14:47
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    You're going to go where people are willing to actually propose real specific tangible things - so you can then demand that people in Congress do these things. An example of this is the Esquire Commission (made up of 4 ex-senators).

    I started a thread about the Esquire Commission's proposal for balancing the budget by 2020. The plan does include some t ...[text shortened]... ere's stuff in there that you disagree with - so you can offer your ideas for improving it.
    Balance the budget by 2020? This is an example of the radical fringe. Don't these bafoons know that if the government does not continue to amass debt people will be dying in the streets!!

    Notice that no sitting senators are proposing this. They could care less.
  14. 25 Oct '10 16:20
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    It's kind of possible that he was joking, isn't it?
    Let me assure you, I wasn't joking.
  15. 25 Oct '10 18:46
    Originally posted by whodey
    Where are we going to go?
    Shuffleboard leagues. Bingo games.