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  1. Joined
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    23 Nov '15 11:492 edits
    http://news.yahoo.com/the-doomsday-ideology-of-isis-192945938.html

    Despite what world leaders like Obama may say, the theology of ISIS is based upon Islam.

    In a boastful press release after the Paris attacks that left 130 dead earlier in the month, ISIS celebrated its “victory” over the city it called the “lead carrier of the cross.”

    “Allah granted victory upon their hands and cast terror into the hearts of the crusaders in their very own homeland,” the group wrote.

    The medieval language is a glimpse into the terror group’s little-discussed apocalyptic ideology, one that draws on prophecies written after Muhammad’s death that were used to motivate Muslims to battle by caliphs who lived more than a thousand years ago. While al-Qaida occasionally hinted at these doomsday writings foretelling a grand battle with infidels at the end of the world, ISIS has made them the bedrock of its brand.

    These prophecies are so entwined with ISIS’ identity that the group has pasted a line from one of them — “a Caliphate in Accordance with the Prophetic Method” — on the coins it has minted, on the badges soldiers wear and even on a billboard marking the beginning of ISIS territory. In that prophecy, Muhammad said that after a “tyrannical monarchy,” an Islamic caliphate would return. The formation of the caliphate would lead to a grand battle with the West that would bring along the end of the world.

    The prophecies ISIS relies on were written dozens and sometimes hundreds of years after Muhammad’s death and are not included in the Quran, as Brookings scholar Will McCants explains in his book “The ISIS Apocalypse.” But the prophecies are widespread and believed by many — one poll in 2012 suggested half of Arabs believed the end of the world was nigh.

    In ISIS’ interpretation, the figure of the Mahdi, or “the rightly guided one” will appear to lead final battles against the Western infidels, called Rome, in northern Syria before the end of days. After the day of judgment, only those who supported the Mahdi will be saved. The Mahdi will appear after the establishment of an Islamic caliphate. (Medieval caliphs, attempting to gin up support for their own battles against the Christian crusaders, claimed to be the Mahdi in the past.) In some of the prophecies, Jesus descends from the heavens to assist the Mahdi in his battle against the infidels, who are led by an Antichrist figure.

    ISIS leadership has made key military decisions based upon these prophecies. It fought in the summer of 2014 to take over the small and militarily unimportant village of Dabiq close to Turkey because it is name-checked in one of the prophecies as a place where the final great battles will occur. The infidels are supposed to gather under “80 flags” in this village, before their defeat. (Dabiq is also the name of ISIS’ monthly magazine.)

    ISIS’ claim that the apocalypse is nigh is a powerful recruitment tool, not unlike an “Act now! 24 hours only!” sales pitch.

    “The belief that the end of the world is coming and you’re going to be fighting on the side of the good guys when the world ends is a powerful motivator,” McCants told Yahoo News. “Young people going to join [ISIS] believe they are participating in a apocalyptic prophecy.”

    “The really interesting thing here from the psychological perspective is the sense of urgency,” said John Horgan, a psychologist and terrorism expert at Georgia State University. “They’re sending the message that the forces of evil are about to reach their goals so you need to act now rather than later. You don’t have the luxury of waiting for this to happen.”


    It’s unknown if the leadership of ISIS really believes in these prophecies or is simply using them to establish legitimacy in the eyes of their supporters. ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi has a Ph.D. in Quranic studies.

    McCants tracked down examples of ISIS supporters and members trying to fit current events into the murky and sometimes conflicting timeline of the prophecies. “Thirty states remain to complete the number of eighty flags that will gather in Dabiq and begin the battle,” one jihadi Tweeted, seemingly waiting for more nations to sign on to fight ISIS before the last grand battle could occur and usher in the end of the world.

    One can imagine ISIS leaders running into trouble if their apocalyptic vision takes too long and supporters begin asking questions and become impatient.

    “Part of why ISIS is trying to goad the West into action is it’s a critical part of fulfilling their prophecies,” Horgan said.

    The group has also refrained from explicitly calling its leader al-Baghdadi the Mahdi, which means its followers know they have to wait for him to appear before the world is ending. Sunni and Shiite beliefs about the Mahdi diverge in one key way: Sunni Islam, the branch of the religion ISIS adheres to, posits that the Mahdi, the prophet’s successor, has yet to come. According to the Shiite tradition, the Mahdi came but will remain hidden until he brings justice to the world.

    That fighters believe they are fulfilling a grand destiny helps explain why thousands of them have been willing to leave more comfortable lives in nations all around the world to join the dangerous and reviled group. “It’s definitely more cultlike than al-Qaida,” said Karen Greenberg, the director of Fordham’s Center on National Security. “It’s got all the accouterments of a cult.”
  2. Joined
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    23 Nov '15 11:541 edit
    This is what non-Muslims must know about Islam.

    In that prophecy, Muhammad said that after a “tyrannical monarchy,” an Islamic caliphate would return. The formation of the caliphate would lead to a grand battle with the West that would bring along the end of the world.

    This is what fuels the fighting in Islam, and will continue to fuel the fighting.
  3. Subscriberno1marauder
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    23 Nov '15 12:061 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    This is what non-Muslims must know about Islam.

    In that prophecy, Muhammad said that after a “tyrannical monarchy,” an Islamic caliphate would return. The formation of the caliphate would lead to a grand battle with the West that would bring along the end of the world.

    This is what fuels the fighting in Islam, and will continue to fuel the fighting.
    This is different from Revelations - how? :

    I saw heaven standing open and there before me was a white horse, whose rider is called Faithful and True. With justice he judges and makes war.
    12 His eyes are like blazing fire, and on his head are many crowns. He has a name written on him that no one knows but he himself.
    13 He is dressed in a robe dipped in blood, and his name is the Word of God.
    14 The armies of heaven were following him, riding on white horses and dressed in fine linen, white and clean.
    15 Out of his mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations. "He will rule them with an iron scepter." He treads the winepress of the fury of the wrath of God Almighty.
    16 On his robe and on his thigh he has this name written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS.
    17 And I saw an angel standing in the sun, who cried in a loud voice to all the birds flying in midair, "Come, gather together for the great supper of God,
    18 so that you may eat the flesh of kings, generals, and mighty men, of horses and their riders, and the flesh of all people, free and slave, small and great."
    19 Then I saw the beast and the kings of the earth and their armies gathered together to make war against the rider on the horse and his army.
    20 But the beast was captured, and with him the false prophet who had performed the miraculous signs on his behalf. With these signs he had deluded those who had received the mark of the beast and worshiped his image. The two of them were thrown alive into the fiery lake of burning sulfur.
    21 The rest of them were killed with the sword that came out of the mouth of the rider on the horse, and all the birds gorged themselves on their flesh.

    Revelation 19:11-21 NIV

    A common theme of religions with anthropomorphic gods is a final battle where good triumphs and evil is destroyed. Islamic superstition is little different from the Christian superstition in this respect.
  4. Joined
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    23 Nov '15 14:17
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    A common theme of religions with anthropomorphic gods is a final battle where good triumphs and evil is destroyed. Islamic superstition is little different from the Christian superstition in this respect.
    One commentator on the current predicament speculated that ISIS could possibly be defeated, or at least substantially discredited, were their enemies (i.e., almost everyone!) to respond to their eschatalogical vision by challenging them to a big military showdown at Dabiq. If an opposing coalition won the battle, this would demonstrate that their theology was false, as indeed it would if the world failed to end.
  5. Standard membersh76
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    23 Nov '15 14:47
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    One commentator on the current predicament speculated that ISIS could possibly be defeated, or at least substantially discredited, were their enemies (i.e., almost everyone!) to respond to their eschatalogical vision by challenging them to a big military showdown at Dabiq. If an opposing coalition won the battle, this would demonstrate that their theology was false, as indeed it would if the world failed to end.
    Unlikely. They would just call it a warm-up war or a pre-Armageddon skirmish.

    Religious extremists rarely let occurrences dictate their belief system.
  6. Cape Town
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    23 Nov '15 16:58
    Originally posted by sh76
    Religious extremists rarely let occurrences dictate their belief system.
    Agreed, although the observation applies to all religious people extremist or otherwise.
  7. The Catbird's Seat
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    23 Nov '15 18:04
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    This is different from Revelations - how? :

    I saw heaven standing open and there before me was a white horse, whose rider is called Faithful and True. With justice he judges and makes war.
    12 His eyes are like blazing fire, and on his head are many crowns. He has a name written on him that no one knows but he himself.
    13 He is dressed in a robe dip ...[text shortened]... royed. Islamic superstition is little different from the Christian superstition in this respect.
    The difference is that Christians seem to have graduated from this notion, while the Islamic world continues to subscribe to it, and live for its fulfillment.
  8. The Catbird's Seat
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    23 Nov '15 18:06
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Agreed, although the observation applies to all religious people extremist or otherwise.
    All religion is based on faith. Only a few, justify a goal of conquest by their faith, and actually pursue that goal.
  9. Subscriberno1marauder
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    23 Nov '15 20:25
    Originally posted by normbenign
    The difference is that Christians seem to have graduated from this notion, while the Islamic world continues to subscribe to it, and live for its fulfillment.
    Gee ask whodey, Eladar, RJ Hinds and the rest if they believe that Revelations is just a story or if they believe the events outlined in it will actually occur.
  10. Subscriberno1marauder
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    23 Nov '15 20:26
    Originally posted by normbenign
    All religion is based on faith. Only a few, justify a goal of conquest by their faith, and actually pursue that goal.
    Your claims of what all Muslims believe are tiresomely false.
  11. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    23 Nov '15 23:01
    Originally posted by normbenign
    The difference is that Christians seem to have graduated from this notion, while the Islamic world continues to subscribe to it, and live for its fulfillment.
    No they haven't.
  12. Standard memberRJHinds
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    24 Nov '15 02:35
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://news.yahoo.com/the-doomsday-ideology-of-isis-192945938.html

    Despite what world leaders like Obama may say, the theology of ISIS is based upon Islam.

    In a boastful press release after the Paris attacks that left 130 dead earlier in the month, ISIS celebrated its “victory” over the city it called the “lead carrier of the cross.”

    “Allah granted v ...[text shortened]... e director of Fordham’s Center on National Security. “It’s got all the accouterments of a cult.”
    This sounds like Obama's ideology. He has said basically the same thing about the Christian crusaders. He also said if it comes down to choosing a side he would go with Islam.
  13. Standard memberRJHinds
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    24 Nov '15 02:402 edits
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Gee ask whodey, Eladar, RJ Hinds and the rest if they believe that Revelations is just a story or if they believe the events outlined in it will actually occur.
    I believe it is a prophesy about the defeat of the Islamic beast empire by Christianity. 😏
  14. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    24 Nov '15 06:32
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I believe it is a prophesy about the defeat of the Islamic beast empire by Christianity. 😏
    It's not even a prophecy.
  15. Cape Town
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    24 Nov '15 06:59
    Originally posted by normbenign
    All religion is based on faith. Only a few, justify a goal of conquest by their faith, and actually pursue that goal.
    You do know that the problems in the Middle East are at least in part caused by Christians wishing to hasten the coming of the end times?
    And I also have to point out that George Bush justified his goal of conquest by his faith and actually pursued that goal. Whether or not he had other motivations (such as oil and domestic politics) he still fit your description perfectly.
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