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  1. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    03 Oct '11 09:32 / 1 edit
    The selling out of black values comment in another thread, prompted this survey question. What is the Black experience in America today?

    I don't live in the States, and have not had the opportunity to visit the place yet, but my impression of what it might be like to live there is a mash up of more than 40 years of stock footage courtesy of Hollywood/Music and the News.

    It made me think. Surely by now there would be tons of African Americans who would be the product of a middle class existence who might be third or even fourth generation College/University graduates. How do these professional, educated Black people, fit into modern day America. Are they marginalized and rejected by both white and black societies, or to what extent is the yawning chasm between white and black just another popular myth?

    So in no particular order I thought I would ask a few questions.

    Is there a difference being black in the city to being black in the suburbs?
    What's the black demographic in % terms of tertiary educated/professional; entrepreneurial/small business; trades; working class/process workers; unemployed?

    In terms of housing, how persistent is the idea of a black neighborhood? Do high concentrations of black people living together go hand in hand with unemployment and low socio economic status?

    Is there a burden of responsibility to be your brothers keeper when you are black?

    To what extent has life imitated art such that for many black people life today looks a lot like the Cosby Show?

    If you are educated and professional and black, and doing well, are you just as likely to reflect the attitudes of Fox pundits when it comes to black issues?

    Is the label black, really just shorthand for saying, unemployed, uneducated and dysfunctional?


    I could go on and on, but hopefully this will kick along an interesting conversation.
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    03 Oct '11 09:39 / 1 edit
    With respect to this topic Ebony magazine and BET are worth glancing at:

    http://www.ebony.com/
    http://www.bet.com/
  3. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    03 Oct '11 11:42
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    With respect to this topic Ebony magazine and BET are worth glancing at:

    http://www.ebony.com/
    http://www.bet.com/
    Some of the articles in Ebony were interesting. Its funny, this is what I was sort of getting at in my own weird way. If you read the articles with all references to black or color redacted, it reads like any other magazine.

    I was hoping to get a quicker education than trawling through issues of Ebony over the next 10 years though...
  4. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    03 Oct '11 12:19 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kmax87
    The selling out of black values comment in another thread, prompted this survey question. What is the Black experience in America today?

    I don't live in the States, and have not had the opportunity to visit the place yet, but my impression of what it might be like to live there is a mash up of more than 40 years of stock footage courtesy of Hollywood/Music al?


    I could go on and on, but hopefully this will kick along an interesting conversation.
    Surely by now there would be tons of African Americans who would be the product of a middle class existence who might be third or even fourth generation College/University graduates.


    There are.


    How do these professional, educated Black people, fit into modern day America. Are they marginalized and rejected by both white and black societies, or to what extent is the yawning chasm between white and black just another popular myth?


    By and large they're not marginalized at all. They're well integrated into society. some poor black people resent them just as they resent any rich person because they're better off. The "yawning chasm" is fiction. By and large, mixed race work groups (which are the norm) and mixed race social groups (slightly less the norm) get along fine. When you break it down to the individual level, race really doesn't matter to the vast majority of people.

    Is there a difference being black in the city to being black in the suburbs?


    Poor people in the inner cities (mostly black, but there are plenty of whites too) have a much different and more difficult lifestyle than anyone. This is a function of economics and opportunity; probably not racism.

    What's the black demographic in % terms of tertiary educated/professional; entrepreneurial/small business; trades; working class/process workers; unemployed?


    I don't have the numbers off hand, but the web does. i.e.,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_outcomes_in_the_United_States_by_race_and_other_classifications

    http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2006/01/b1549603.html

    etc.

    In terms of housing, how persistent is the idea of a black neighborhood? Do high concentrations of black people living together go hand in hand with unemployment and low socio economic status?


    This is a phenomenon in inner city slums. In the suburbs, there are "black" and "white" communities, of which the white communities are often, but not exclusively, a bit wealthier. There are probably more mixed communities, though.

    Is there a burden of responsibility to be your brothers keeper when you are black?


    Wouldn't know; but I'd assume that if you had poor relatives they'd be seeking help whether you were white, black, brown or green.

    To what extent has life imitated art such that for many black people life today looks a lot like the Cosby Show?


    nobody lives like The Cosby Show. She's senior partner in a law firm( yet is almost always home) while he's an obstetrician who also rarely seems to be at work and has all the time in the world to get involved in nonsense with the kids. Both parents work full time, they have no domestic help and yet the house is always spotless. The worst trouble any of the teens ever get into is that one forgets to clean his or her room.

    Yeah, that's realistic for black and white people.

    If you are educated and professional and black, and doing well, are you just as likely to reflect the attitudes of Fox pundits when it comes to black issues?


    If you are educated and professional and black, and doing well, you still are likely to want to keep the benefits of affirmative action for yourself and your children. You also probably have relatives receiving government benefits (as many whites do as well) and you're not particularly anxious to see them cut. Therefore, odds are, you support the liberal end of the political spectrum.


    If you are educated and professional and black, and doing well, are you just as likely to reflect the attitudes of Fox pundits when it comes to black issues?

    Is the label black, really just shorthand for saying, unemployed, uneducated and dysfunctional?
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    03 Oct '11 19:52
    Eddie Murphy has a skit where he's a little boy in his rich entertainment family house and he practices his poop jokes, scandalizing the family. I'll try to find it later.
  6. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    03 Oct '11 22:59
    Originally posted by sh76
    Surely by now there would be tons of African Americans who would be the product of a middle class existence who might be third or even fourth generation College/University graduates.


    There are.


    [quote]How do these professional, educated Black people, fit into modern day America. Are they marginalized and rejected by both white and blac ...[text shortened]... , really just shorthand for saying, unemployed, uneducated and dysfunctional?
    Thanks for that. As to the Cosby thing, its not so much that it was likely having a senior partner and an obstetrician married and always being available at home to their family that was significant, but that the minutiae of daily life in the Cosby household seemed as mainstream and as far enough away from any black troubled past that seemed its biggest message.
  7. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    03 Oct '11 23:08
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Eddie Murphy has a skit where he's a little boy in his rich entertainment family house and he practices his poop jokes, scandalizing the family. I'll try to find it later.
    Eddie Murphy has a million moments that describe being black in America ( like Richard Prior before him) and I suppose much of what I would consider to be bedrock truth about black life in America is probably to a large degree filtered by the comic routines of Cosby, Prior and Murphy. The truth is probably somewhere between them, right?

    But back to Murphy and that brilliant scene in Beverley Hills Cop 1, where he mocks the urbane black LAPD cop for being too 'white' and gives him advice on letting his 'blackness' out. I've always wondered how accurate that scene was in describing divergent modes of black behaviour.
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    04 Oct '11 02:14 / 1 edit
    Here's the clip:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXnCvFHOp_8

    Might be some "bad" words in the following stand up comedy but the beginning skit is pretty clean...
  9. 04 Oct '11 04:22 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by kmax87
    Some of the articles in Ebony were interesting. Its funny, this is what I was sort of getting at in my own weird way. If you read the articles with all references to black or color redacted, it reads like any other magazine.

    I was hoping to get a quicker education than trawling through issues of Ebony over the next 10 years though...
    There is no 'quicker education' and I doubt there is any way there, even being born black in the US of A.
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    04 Oct '11 07:50
    Steve Harvey is another comedian who expresses what it's like to be black in the USA. He's on youtube.
  11. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    04 Oct '11 12:53
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Here's the clip:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXnCvFHOp_8

    Might be some "bad" words in the following stand up comedy but the beginning skit is pretty clean...
    things that make her go woooooooooo!
  12. 05 Oct '11 02:36
    Originally posted by kmax87
    The selling out of black values comment in another thread, prompted this survey question. What is the Black experience in America today?

    I don't live in the States, and have not had the opportunity to visit the place yet, but my impression of what it might be like to live there is a mash up of more than 40 years of stock footage courtesy of Hollywood/Music ...[text shortened]... al?


    I could go on and on, but hopefully this will kick along an interesting conversation.
    I think you can get a "feel" for it by reading a mix of black columnists. The truth lies in a mix of Starr Parker and Tavis Smlley.
  13. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    05 Oct '11 05:52
    Will Smith - Summertime
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr0tTbTbmVA
  14. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    08 Oct '11 13:06
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Will Smith - Summertime
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr0tTbTbmVA
    Blast from the past. Question, how big a slice of black life does that represent? For all intents and purposes it looks relaxed, comfortable and relatively carefree.
  15. 08 Oct '11 17:06
    Enough of this stupidity that they are entirely integrated into society. Check the unemployment rate for black Americans. 16.7% for blacks and 8% for whites per CNN.

    As for poverty - " Poverty rates for blacks and Hispanics greatly exceed the national average. In 2010, 27.4 percent of blacks and 26.6 percent of Hispanics were poor, compared to 9.9 percent of non-Hispanic whites and 12.1 percent of Asians." http://www.npc.umich.edu/poverty/