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  1. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    03 Aug '16 13:20
    This study is a few years old, but according to this one metric, it might be.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/15/a-fascinating-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-racially-tolerant-countries/

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/12/09/america-is-among-least-racist-countries-in-the-world/
  2. 03 Aug '16 14:14
    Originally posted by sh76
    This study is a few years old, but according to this one metric, it might be.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/15/a-fascinating-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-racially-tolerant-countries/

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/12/09/america-is-among-least-racist-countries-in-the-world/
    "The more frequently that people in a given country say they don't want neighbors from other races, the economists reasoned, the less racially tolerant you could call that society."
    oblivious or indifferent to the fact that their answer is racist. you can still be racist and intolerant and able to not incriminate yourself on a survey.
  3. 03 Aug '16 14:21
    Originally posted by sh76
    This study is a few years old, but according to this one metric, it might be.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/15/a-fascinating-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-racially-tolerant-countries/

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/12/09/america-is-among-least-racist-countries-in-the-world/
    This could also be related to attitudes of society towards "race." I wonder whether the rise of Trump will increase this figure? Not that he makes people more racist per se, but perhaps people are more likely to admit they are racists with Trump making overt racism more accepted/less controversial. The figure in France seems to correspond roughly to the percentage of people supporting the racist party (the Trump analog).
  4. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    03 Aug '16 15:01
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    "The more frequently that people in a given country say they don't want neighbors from other races, the economists reasoned, the less racially tolerant you could call that society."
    oblivious or indifferent to the fact that their answer is racist. you can still be racist and intolerant and able to not incriminate yourself on a survey.
    Yes, but that is true across the board and so the discounting level (i.e., the number of racists who don't want to admit they are) should be fairly consistent from place the place, making the survey still an apples-to-apples comparison.
  5. 03 Aug '16 15:15
    Originally posted by sh76
    Yes, but that is true across the board and so the discounting level (i.e., the number of racists who don't want to admit they are) should be fairly consistent from place the place, making the survey still an apples-to-apples comparison.
    I'm not convinced that this is true - for instance, if you would've asked the same question in the United States in 1900, I think "white" people saying they don't want to live next to "black" people would be pretty common.
  6. Standard member vivify
    rain
    03 Aug '16 15:53 / 2 edits
    I think most people foreign to any particular country would be surprised at the bigotry that's not usually apparent to the rest of the world. For example, the British are stereotyped as having a higher level of class, sophistication, etiquette, intelligence and rationality than many other societies. Brexit revealed an alarming number of people who sounded EXACTLY like Trump supporters.

    I doubt the U.S. is the least racist country, but there are parts of it that are definitely much more diverse than in most other areas around the world. I was born and raised in Queens, NYC, where in the same classroom, my classmates were white, black, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Guyanese and Trinidadian, with a fair number of Asians (as well as mixed people, like myself). This was a common mix all throughout my childhood, from elementary to high school. I've also had classmates from Kuwait and India. Playgrounds and neighborhoods were just as mixed

    However, when I moved to upstate N.Y., the lack of diversity was shocking, since that's what I expected the rest of the state to be like. Most people were either black or white, with a much lower percentage of Hispanics. Asians were somewhat rare, outside of certain types of stores and restaurant owners. In addition, areas were segregated; there were "black" and "white" areas, with very few places having an equal mix.
  7. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    03 Aug '16 15:55
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I'm not convinced that this is true - for instance, if you would've asked the same question in the United States in 1900, I think "white" people saying they don't want to live next to "black" people would be pretty common.
    It's 2016 throughout the world now, though.

    Perhaps it's more socially acceptable to be a racist in some parts of the world, but I think the US vs. Europe, for example, is a pretty fair comparison.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Aug '16 17:41
    Originally posted by sh76
    It's 2016 throughout the world now, though.

    Perhaps it's more socially acceptable to be a racist in some parts of the world, but I think the US vs. Europe, for example, is a pretty fair comparison.
    I used to live and work in Thailand, like 3 years or so back in the Vietnam war era. What surprised me was the Viet village of refugee's living in Thailand.

    Thai's considered Viet's like whites in the US view blacks.

    One day I was walking through NKP (the town I lived in, close to the Mekong). So what happened was some kid tied a picture of Ho Chi Min to the tail of a cat along with bells and such with disparaging words written on it.

    The refugee town had about 20,000 Viet Nam refugees and when they saw that, about 1000 of them were incensed and took off rioting, overturning cars and such, military had to come in to stop them.

    That was my first hint that racial bias was not limited to the US.

    Actually, it wasn't even racial, I think DNA wise, they were pretty close.

    I guess this was a cultural bias.

    I was surprised they allowed 20,000 odd Viet refugees to establish a town at all given what was proven to be the bias of Thai's against Viet's.
  9. 03 Aug '16 18:33
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    "The more frequently that people in a given country say they don't want neighbors from other races, the economists reasoned, the less racially tolerant you could call that society."
    oblivious or indifferent to the fact that their answer is racist. you can still be racist and intolerant and able to not incriminate yourself on a survey.
    In many countries, being accused of racism is tantamount to treason. Generally, that is true in the US. Most people with racial sensitivities or loyalties don't want to be painted as racist.

    There is a wide range of acceptable beliefs and feelings toward other people of differing races in the US, which is probably more tolerant of differences than most cultures around the globe.
  10. 03 Aug '16 18:43
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I'm not convinced that this is true - for instance, if you would've asked the same question in the United States in 1900, I think "white" people saying they don't want to live next to "black" people would be pretty common.
    Having a preference (racial) for prospective neighbors is now a proxy for racism? Where I live, it is quite common for subdivisions/neighborhoods to not only be "white" but to also be almost entirely of a single nationality for example Polish. Not surprising since immigrants would likely be more comfortable among similar national origins.

    Of course a mitigating factor with black folks is the high incidence of criminal conduct. When my mixed family looked for a home to buy, we looked for a "mixed" neighborhood, naively believing it would remain that way. In a couple of years is was nearly entirely black. Other than some forced integration of housing, how can diversity be forced on people?
  11. 03 Aug '16 18:48
    Originally posted by sh76
    Yes, but that is true across the board and so the discounting level (i.e., the number of racists who don't want to admit they are) should be fairly consistent from place the place, making the survey still an apples-to-apples comparison.
    "Yes, but that is true across the board and so the discounting level (i.e., the number of racists who don't want to admit they are) should be fairly consistent from place the place, making the survey still an apples-to-apples comparison"

    no, because other places don't have a 5 to 1 ratio of police killing unarmed black people.
  12. 03 Aug '16 18:53
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Having a preference (racial) for prospective neighbors is now a proxy for racism?
    Yes norm, not liking someone merely because of the colour of their skin is pretty much textbook racism.
  13. 03 Aug '16 18:54
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    "Yes, but that is true across the board and so the discounting level (i.e., the number of racists who don't want to admit they are) should be fairly consistent from place the place, making the survey still an apples-to-apples comparison"

    no, because other places don't have a 5 to 1 ratio of police killing unarmed black people.
    Seems to me that persons accusing others of racism are highly likely of harboring racist beliefs themselves. Most of us don't see everything through a prism of race.
  14. 03 Aug '16 18:56
    Originally posted by sh76
    It's 2016 throughout the world now, though.

    Perhaps it's more socially acceptable to be a racist in some parts of the world, but I think the US vs. Europe, for example, is a pretty fair comparison.
    It's a bit simplistic to say that every society advances equally with respect to time. Attitudes towards "race" can and do vary significantly across the globe, as the survey also indicates. Whether this is because people are actually less racist or because racism is more of a taboo (or a combination of both) is not clear from such a survey.
  15. 03 Aug '16 19:00
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Yes norm, not liking someone merely because of the colour of their skin is pretty much textbook racism.
    Where I live, who buys a home in the neighborhood may severely depreciate property values. From the moment my mixed racial family bought our home, the assessed property values stopped upward movement. My eldest daughter, who could "pass" had trouble in school. Just in the first grade. I'd have been smarter, and saved money to buy in an all black community. Where I did buy ended up in a few short years being that except for me.