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  1. 19 Aug '16 17:48
    Currently the US has 100 medals. The nearest competitor, China, only has 61.

    What does this say if anything about the US and the rest of the world?
  2. 19 Aug '16 17:56 / 1 edit
    Has anyone heard of the Olympian who has won gold in 6 straight Olympics? No, it's not Michael Phelps the swimmer.

    The reason none of us have heard of her, yes her DUCHESS, is because she is a sharp shooter and a 2nd Amendment advocate. Either that or the media hates women.

    You be the judge.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-unknown-olympic-champion-1471562129
  3. 19 Aug '16 18:04
    What must it be like to be in the Olympics representing Israel?

    Front Page Magazine, by Ari Lieberman, Aug. 15, 2016:

    Egyptian judoka, Islam El Shahaby, disgraced himself and his country at the Rio games this past Friday. The disgrace was not the result of his failure to medal nor was it the result of his loss to Israeli judoka, Or Sasson. The disgrace was the result of extreme unsportsmanlike conduct exhibited by the Egyptian. Following his loss, El Shahaby walked away without bowing to his opponent – an act unheard of in the sport – and then refused to shake the Israeli’s outstretched hand.

    The disgraceful conduct drew jeers from the crowd and the referee ordered El Shahaby to return to the mat area and bow. The Egyptian complied but rather than bowing, gave a pathetic nod with his head prompting additional booing from the audience. Or Sasson brushed off the insult and went on to claim the bronze for his nation.

    Sasson said that he expected that the Egyptian would snub him but decided to extend his hand nonetheless to show his opponent “respect.” He added that bowing and showing respect for an opponent is something that he “was educated to do.”

    El Shahaby’s ignominious conduct is not an anomaly but rather reflects the norm among athletes from Muslim nations. They routinely engage in conduct that brings disrepute to themselves and the nations they represent.

    At the start of the Rio games, the Lebanese delegation refused to allow members of the Israeli team to board the same bus. The Israelis were then forced to find alternate transportation. Following that incident, a Saudi judoka faked an injury in a deliberate effort to avoid a match against her Israeli counterpart. In June 2016, a Syrian boxer forfeited a match against an Israeli during the world boxing championship in Azerbaijan thus forfeiting any chance of qualifying for the Rio games.

    In June 2013, in one of the most bizarre incidents of unsportsmanlike conduct, an Egyptian wrestler exhibited traits associated with a rabid dog by biting her Israeli opponent in the back and drawing blood. The Egyptian was suspended while the Israeli, Ilana Kartysh, captured the gold.


    The incident involving El Shahaby at Rio was identical to an incident involving another Egyptian judoka during a 2011 tournament. Ramadan Darwish refused to shake hands with Arik Ze’evi, his Israeli opponent, after the Israeli trounced Darwish. Like El Shahaby, he also refused to bow. Darwish’s crass behavior prompted the referee to recall him to the floor and only after repeated requests did Darwish return, only to direct his bow toward the referee and not toward his opponent thus compounding the indignity. The disgraceful spectacle can beviewed in this clip.

    In a 2010 weightlifting tournament, the Iranian runner-up refused to shake the hand of the Israeli winner, Sergio Britva. The Iranian was then forced to endure listening to the Israeli national anthem while the Israeli flag was raised but quickly bolted from the podium immediately following the conclusion of the anthem.

    As long as the International Olympics Committee (IOC) and other governing sports bodies remain passive in the face of these repeated egregious transgressions and fail to ban the offending nations from all international sporting events, these outrages will continue. Only drastic action in the form of expulsion will serve to modify the offending behavior.

    But the phenomena of misbehavior and unsportsmanlike conduct by the athletes of Muslim nations represents a far greater problem that transcends sports. Xenophobia and anti-Semitism have become part and parcel of much of the Muslim world. In that medieval world, hatred of Jews and Israel permeates every field including politics, education, religion, art, culture and sport. Hate is taught to children from birth and passed along from generation to generation. It is amplified by official government institutions through the various education and religious ministries and trickles its way to every facet of Muslim life.

    The damage caused by years of relentless brainwashing and institutional racism will take decades, if not generations to reverse and, with few exceptions, it does not look like any Arab or Muslim nation is making any meaningful effort to address this deleterious trend. In fact, quite the opposite is true. Most Egyptians approved of El Shahaby’s disgraceful conduct, and his critics within Egypt limited their criticism to the fact that he didn’t forfeit the game.

    Unless the IOC and other governing international sports bodies take decisive action against the offenders, Israeli sports figures will unfortunately have to endure this boorish behavior for the foreseeable future. Israel however, can take solace in the fact that it sent its largest ever Olympic delegation to Rio and its athletes continue to score success on the international stage.
  4. 19 Aug '16 19:05
    Originally posted by whodey
    Currently the US has 100 medals. The nearest competitor, China, only has 61.

    What does this say if anything about the US and the rest of the world?
    Well clearly population and money are significant factors.
    Please tell us how the US does in terms of medals per capita, or medals per GDP.
  5. 19 Aug '16 19:10
    Here is Zambia's performance:
    http://www.okayafrica.com/in-brief/rio-2016-zambia-judo-upset-mathews-punza/

    Keep in mind that Zambia has almost no sports (Soccer only as far as I know) where it is possible to make a living as a professional (certainly not Judo).
  6. 19 Aug '16 19:10
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Well clearly population and money are significant factors.
    Please tell us how the US does in terms of medals per capita, or medals per GDP.
    I have been watching Great Briton in particular with much interest.

    They have roughly 20% of the US population but are doing spectacularly well in the medal count. Clearly they are doing something well.

    And it must be a lot of fun to be a Jamaican about now.
  7. 19 Aug '16 21:35
    Originally posted by whodey
    Has anyone heard of the Olympian who has won gold in 6 straight Olympics? No, it's not Michael Phelps the swimmer.

    The reason none of us have heard of her, yes her DUCHESS, is because she is a sharp shooter and a 2nd Amendment advocate. Either that or the media hates women.

    You be the judge.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-unknown-olympic-champion-1471562129
    Without clicking on the link in Whodey's post, I suspect that Whodey's thinking of Kim Rhode.
    If so, Whodey's claim that she 'won gold in 6 straight Olympics' is wrong (no surprise).
    Kim Rhode has won medals in six consecutive Olympics, but only three of them are gold.
  8. 19 Aug '16 21:55 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead to Whodey
    Well clearly population and money are significant factors.
    Please tell us how the US does in terms of medals per capita, or medals per GDP.
    Comparing population size is useful only up to a point. It can be misleading because
    more populous countries are not allowed to enter many times more athletes in every sport.

    Consider table tennis. China has the four highest ranked male players in the world.
    But it can enter only two of them in men's singles. In the team competition, each team
    includes only three players, so Fan Zhengdong (ranked 2nd in the world) was not even
    selected to represent China in the Olympics. It's often been said that it's harder for a
    player to qualify to represent China than to win a medal in the Olympics.

    It's also often been said that the best players are the Chinese who play for China and
    the next best players generally are the (ethnic) Chinese who play for other countries.
    There are strong Japanese, Korean, and European players. Waldner (Sweden), who's
    now retired, is still much respected and admired by the Chinese.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/18/sports/olympics/at-least-44-table-tennis-players-in-rio-are-chinese-born-six-play-for-china.html

    "At Least 44 Table Tennis Players in Rio are Chinese-Born. Six Play for China."

    China has a large supply of world-class players in table tennis, but only a tiny minority
    of them could ever represent China. So, following the market forces, many of these
    Chinese players emigrate (whether in reality or on paper) and represent other countries.
    It's sometimes been said that an international match may be a question of 'Are our Chinese better than yours?'

    Given China's vast population, the popularity and tradition of table tennis, and the high
    level of table tennis coaching and culture, I don't foresee an end to Chinese domination.
    And, given all these facts, I don't see why there *should* be an end to Chinese excelling in table tennis.
  9. 19 Aug '16 22:43
    Originally posted by whodey
    Currently the US has 100 medals. The nearest competitor, China, only has 61.

    What does this say if anything about the US and the rest of the world?
    Primarily, it says that of all relatively wealthy countries, the United States has by far the largest population. It also says something about how popular the kind of sports that are practiced in the Olympics are. On a per capita basis, Hungarian athletes have won about 5 times more medals so far than American athletes.
  10. 19 Aug '16 23:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Without clicking on the link in Whodey's post, I suspect that Whodey's thinking of Kim Rhode.
    If so, Whodey's claim that she 'won gold in 6 straight Olympics' is wrong (no surprise).
    Kim Rhode has won medals in six consecutive Olympics, but only three of them are gold.
    From the article:

    "American skeet-shooter Kim Rhode last week became the first athlete, male or female, to win a medal at six summer games and the first on five continents, but don’t look for her on a box of Wheaties"

    Now where is your source?
  11. 19 Aug '16 23:48 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra to Whodey
    Primarily, it says that of all relatively wealthy countries, the United States has by far the largest population. It also says something about how popular the kind of sports that are practiced in the Olympics are. On a per capita basis, Hungarian athletes have won about 5 times more medals so far than American athletes.
    The USA accumulates a disproportionately high number of its Olympic medals in swimming.
    Fortunately for the USA, swimming has an extremely large number of events, allowing an
    individual who excels in shorter distances to pile up several medals, not including the relays.

    Americans should excel in Olympic swimming not only because of the USA's large population
    but also because the USA's wealth enables it to have more Olympic-size swimming pools
    (I suspect), which offer the necessary training opportunities, than any other country.
    A poor child in Kenya may grow up to become a distance runner, not a swimmer at the Olympics.

    For a country with a small population, the 'Olympic medal per capita' figure can be
    easily skewed by even one exceptional athlete. Hungary's Katinka Hosszu won three
    gold medals and one silver medal at the 2016 Olympics.
  12. 19 Aug '16 23:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    From the article:

    "American skeet-shooter Kim Rhode last week became the first athlete, male or female, to win a medal at six summer games and the first on five continents, but don’t look for her on a box of Wheaties"

    Now where is your source?
    The troll Whodey keeps showing that he's an illiterate idiot.

    Here's Whodey's original FALSE claim:
    "[Kim Rhode] won *gold* in 6 straight Olympics."
    --Whodey (page 1, post 2)

    And here's what Whodey quotes to 'support' (sarcasm) his FALSE claim:
    "Kim Rhode ... win *a medal* at six summer games."

    Can Whodey comprehend that NOT ALL OLYMPIC MEDALS ARE GOLD MEDALS?
    WINNING ANY MEDAL IS NOT NECESSARILY WINNING A GOLD MEDAL.
    In fact, Kim Rhode has won three gold medals, one silver medal, and two bronze medals.
  13. Standard member lemon lime
    blah blah blah
    20 Aug '16 00:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    What must it be like to be in the Olympics representing Israel?

    Front Page Magazine, by Ari Lieberman, Aug. 15, 2016:

    Egyptian judoka, Islam El Shahaby, disgraced himself and his country at the Rio games this past Friday. The disgrace was not the result of his failure to medal nor was it the result of his loss to Israeli judoka, Or Sasson. The disgrace ...[text shortened]... Olympic delegation to Rio and its athletes continue to score success on the international stage.
    I'm not surprised by any of this. The offenders are expected to suspend a lifetime of political and social conditioning, and momentarily show respect to a people they've learned throughout their lives to hate and regard as an enemy. It would take an enormous effort of will for many of them to even so much as fake a gesture of respect.
  14. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    20 Aug '16 01:42
    Originally posted by whodey
    From the article:

    "American skeet-shooter Kim Rhode last week became the first athlete, male or female, to win a medal at six summer games and the first on five continents, but don’t look for her on a box of Wheaties"

    Now where is your source?
    The media and Wheaties are primarily interested in those US athletes who do well in sports that American audiences are interested in and pay attention to. Since virtually no one in the US cares about the winners in Olympic skeet shooting, it is rather unsurprising that Ms. Rhode isn't particularly well-known. Trying to compare her with Phelps who has won a record number of gold medals and competes in a "glamour" and popular sport is a bit ludicrous and trying to make it into some kind of political point is really ridiculous.
  15. Standard member vivify
    rain
    20 Aug '16 02:57 / 6 edits
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Well clearly population and money are significant factors.
    Please tell us how the US does in terms of medals per capita, or medals per GDP.
    It should be noted that if the U.S. won every single gold medal in all 306 events, the U.S. would STILL have less gold medals per capita than Greneda currently has.