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Debates Forum

  1. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 20:51
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/15/she-prayed-she-would-be-martyred-gaza-parents-mourn-their-dead

    "'She prayed she would be martyred': Gaza parents mourn their dead."

    "At 14 years old, Wesal Sheikh Khalil had already made plans for her funeral.
    If Israeli troops were to shoot her during protests on the Gaza border,
    the Palestinian teenager had told her mother, she should be buried at
    the spot where she died or in the plot next to her grandfather’s grave.

    “She thought death was better than this life,” said Reem Abu Irmana
    a day after she lost her youngest daughter. “Every time she went to the
    demonstrations she prayed to God that she would be martyred.”

    "For a decade, Israel and Egypt have imposed tight restrictions of the
    movement of goods and people into Gaza, and Abu Irmana said life had
    become unbearable for her seven children, with the family having to
    move every three or four months as they could not afford the rent."

    "The family say they are from a small village they have never visited in what is now Israel.
    Three generations have lived in Gaza’s cramped al-Bureij refugee camp,
    in a section of the neighbourhood that residents call Block D."

    "Wesal never left Gaza, Abu Irmana said, recalling a girl she described as “full of joy”.
    Wesal had written a song for her mother’s upcoming birthday, which
    she had memorised and sung around the house in her last days."

    "“My life is the same,” Abu Irmana said when asked about her plans for the future.
    “The only change is I don’t have a daughter.”"
  2. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 20:58
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/19/sometimes-dancing-sometimes-furious-a-girl-shot-dead-in-gaza

    "'Sometimes dancing, sometimes furious': a girl shot dead in Gaza.
    Wesal Sheikh Khalil was an ordinary teenager confronting an extraordinary political situation."

    "The family of Wesal Sheikh Khalil say that in a matter of weeks the teenager experienced a
    complete transformation, from a hop-scotching child to an adolescent infuriated by injustice in Gaza.

    “You are cowards,” she screamed at her aunts when they refused to join protests at the border,
    where health officials say Israeli forces have killed more than 110 and shot thousands since demonstrations began in late March."

    "Wesal, 14, was shot dead on Monday, one of more than 60 people killed as Israeli snipers fired on protesters.
    The teenager has left behind a family who are grieving, but who also feel purpose in their loss.
    “Now she is dead, I’m ready,” said another aunt, Anwar. “After what she did, we are not afraid.”"

    "..children in Gaza being shot is not unusual. The United Nations Children’s Fund, Unicef,
    says more than 1,000 have been wounded since protests began, some resulting in amputations.
    Save the Children says its own study found 250 children have been shot with live ammunition."

    "Wesal focused on her passions – playing outside in the streets and learning to read the Qur’an
    using an audio version downloaded on her mother’s phone. Reading was difficult, but she loved
    mathematics and, inspired by her favourite teacher, wanted to teach the subject in the future.
    Drawing was another hobby, and her mother keeps a picture of a sketch her daughter made
    for her three weeks ago in a school notebook. It shows hearts, and a dedication in Arabic:
    “The love of my soul”."

    "She would flip-flop from joy and warmth to rages and fatalism. Wesal started to crave death.
    She told her mother that if she died, there would be more room for her siblings and they
    would not have to live cramped “like fish in a net”."

    "“She had nothing. Not like her friends. She was jealous. She was deeply depressed,”
    said Abu Irmana. “Sometimes dancing, sometimes furious."
  3. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 21:238 edits
    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/may/18/a-suicide-in-gaza

    "A suicide in Gaza:
    How the death of a talented young Palestinian writer brought to light a sharp rise in suicides."
    --Sarah Helm

    "A talented writer whose short stories, many posted on his Facebook page, had won a wide
    audience, Mohanned [Younis] was about to graduate in pharmacy, expecting excellent grades.
    In his writing, he gave voice to the grief and despair of his generation. Only books gave him some escape."

    "Such was Mohanned’s social media following that news of his death reverberated across Gaza
    and beyond with a flood of shock, sadness and admiration. “He was a fighter who only
    had his sad stories to fight with,” was one of many comments posted on Facebook.
    But the very public mourning for the death of a talented young writer meant that Mohanned’s
    suicide was not just one more tragedy in a territory where thousands of young lives are cut short.
    Now it was impossible to deny what many had been whispering: the misery of the siege
    and despair for the future, especially among the most talented young Gazans, was
    leading to a disturbing upsurge in suicides."

    "Often it has looked as if these protesters were literally throwing themselves in front of Israeli bullets.
    In the early days of the protests, I spoke to young people on the buffer zone who said they didn’t
    care if they died. “We are dying in Gaza anyway. We might as well die being shot,” said a teenager"

    "If the world’s cameras were to move a little deeper into Gaza, into the streets and behind
    the doors of people’s homes, they would see the desperation in almost every home.
    After 10 years of siege, the 2 million people of Gaza, living packed on a tiny strip, find
    themselves without work, their economy killed off, without the bare essentials for decent
    life – electricity or running water – and without any hope of freedom, or any sign that
    their situation will change. The siege is fracturing minds, pushing the most vulnerable to
    suicide in numbers never seen before.

    Until recently, suicide has been rare here, partly due to Palestinian resilience, acquired
    over 70 years of conflict, and strong clan networks, but mostly because killing oneself is
    forbidden in traditional Muslim societies. Only when suicide is an act of jihad are the
    dead considered martyrs who go to heaven; others go to hell.

    In nearly three decades of reporting from Gaza, I almost never heard stories of suicide before 2016....
    By the end of 2016, suicides were happening so often that the phenomenon had started
    to become public knowledge. Figures quoted by local journalists suggested the number
    of suicides in 2016 was at least three times the number in 2015. But according to Gaza’s
    health professionals, while figures cited in the media do indicate a substantial rise, they
    vastly underestimate the true rate. Suicides are “disguised” as falls or other accidents,
    and misreporting and censorship are common because of the stigma against suicide."

    "Men and women of all age groups, from all social backgrounds, are vulnerable to suicidal impulses,
    say doctors in Gaza. On a single day in March, a girl of 15 and a boy of 16 both hanged themselves.
    Among the dead are men who despair because they can’t support their families; women
    and children who are victims of abuse, often in situations of severe poverty and overcrowding;
    and even pregnant women, who say they don’t want to bring children into a life in Gaza.
    In April, a woman who was seven months pregnant slit her wrists.

    Among the most vulnerable of all are Gaza’s brightest students, some of whom have killed
    themselves just before or after graduating. In March, while interviewing a bankrupt businessman
    in his home, I saw a photograph of a smart, bespectacled young man, prominently displayed
    – in such a way that I assumed he had been a “martyr”, someone killed in the conflict.
    But his portrait displayed none of the iconography associated with the martyr posters
    that are visible all over Gaza. I had a translator with me, and he recognised the picture:
    the businessman’s son had been one of his cleverest friends at university.
    “He hanged himself,” said the businessman. “He saw no future in Gaza.”"

    "Friends said he had [Mohanned Younis] fought the enemy with his pen, and had died a victim of the siege.
    On his death Mohanned also won warm praise for his courage and his writing from many of his
    social media fans, and even, in a eulogy, from the Palestinian minister of culture, Dr Ihab Bseiso"

    "He wrote of his personal sadness. His parents divorced when he was a child, and Mohanned
    felt rejected by his father. His readers could relate to this pain too, because every family
    in Gaza is broken: most have had members killed in the conflict, and many have also
    been separated by years of exile, or torn apart by imprisonment. Thousands of Palestinians
    are today locked up in Israeli jails.

    He had a large female readership: women were drawn to his particular melancholy.
    “He could write about the absurdity of all our lives – the humiliation, as well as the tragedy.
    He knew this was a fake place,” said one young woman I know, who had escaped through the
    tunnels into Egypt in order to take up her American scholarship. “It’s normal,” she laughed.

    "Mohanned’s hero was Bassel al-Araj, a youth movement leader in the West Bank who
    advocated peaceful protest,"

    "According to Eyad Sarraj, a charismatic Gaza psychiatrist, who in 1990 founded the
    Gaza Community Mental Health programme, suicide attacks were proliferating because
    of a sense that hopelessness kept getting worse, which produced “a despair where
    living becomes no different from dying”."

    "BUT OSLO FAILED TO ADDRESS THE INJUSTICES OF 1948. This was one of the reasons
    the deal was not universally welcomed, particularly in Gaza, which has the highest concentration
    of 1948 refugees. Almost all of them were farmers whose land and houses were seized
    by Israel during or immediately after the war, and their crops and other possessions looted.
    The Arab villages were filled by Jewish immigrants or destroyed. Of the 2 million Palestinians
    in Gaza today, 1.3 million are refugees or descendants of those who fled here in 1948,
    whose right to return home is enshrined in UN resolution 194."

    "By the time Mohanned was five, the Oslo experiment was collapsing, as few of the promised
    changes materialised. Betrayal fuelled support for the Islamic militant organisation Hamas,
    rivals of the secular movement, Fatah, which had supported Oslo."

    "Gaza was now choked off from the outside world, as Israel blocked movement across
    its borders for people, fuel and food – everything except minimal humanitarian aid.
    The southern crossing into Egypt at Rafah was also closed as Egyptian president Hosni
    Mubarak, also eager to contain Islamist radicals, colluded with Israel. It was in this chokehold
    that Mohanned Younis, still only a teenager, found his voice – telling the world what it
    was to live behind the ever higher prison walls."

    "As Mohanned prepared for university, he found his own freedom through writing and reading.
    He taught himself English, hoping to study English literature, and although his mother
    persuaded him instead to study pharmacy, as the job prospects were better, literature
    remained his first love."

    "Finding books was difficult; often the best way was to get them smuggled through the tunnels..."
    "We opened a cupboard and out spilled a torrent of books. There were novels – Dostoevsky,
    Dickens – and philosophy – Wittgenstein for Beginners, Hegel, Richard Dawkins’s
    The Magic of Reality. Among the dramatists were Euripides, Eugène Ionesco, Terence
    Rattigan and Arthur Miller. Here was A History of Zionism, stacked above works by
    Che Guevara and Charles Darwin. Most were Arabic translations, some were in English.
    Perhaps Mohanned read each page of this vast collection, or perhaps he just liked to
    possess them, it’s hard to know. But sitting here inside these four walls, accompanied by
    George Bernard Shaw, Sophocles and Mahmoud Darwish, he was able to break out of
    Gaza’s walls and connect with a wider world."

    "Such was the [Israeli] destruction [of Gaza] in 2014 that the world started to pay attention.
    There was hope among Palestinian human rights lawyers that they could bring a war-crimes
    case against Israel. The then UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, declared that the siege
    must end and that the world should pay for Gaza’s homes, reservoirs and factories to be rebuilt...
    [My note: That did not happen.] More than 80% of people were now dependent on food aid.
    Behind closed doors, particularly where bombing had been heavy in 2014, I saw blighted lives."

    "For the first time in all the years I have been reporting from Gaza, I encountered children begging,
    heard talk of prostitution, and saw evidence of widespread drug addiction and domestic abuse,
    often in homes where as many as 10 people lived in a single room. They had not been
    rehoused since the 2014 bombardment."

    "The international media had lost interest, apart from occasionally predicting a new intifada...
    I asked if a new Mandela was likely to appear in Palestine. “If he did, the Israelis would shoot him,” said one.
    In March 2017, Mohanned’s hero, Bassel al-Araj, the writer and one-time advocate of
    nonviolent resistance, was shot dead by Israeli troops."

    "During the spring and summer of 2017, I heard more reports from doctors about suicides
    that were meant to look like accidents....I heard from witnesses about desperate people
    who had walked into the buffer zone, hoping to be shot. A young woman I knew told me
    she had taken an overdose because she didn’t want to marry or raise children in Gaza."

    Continued in the next post
  4. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 21:35
    Continuing from the previous post:

    "The rise in suicides is part of a much wider crisis of mental health in Gaza, he said.
    Almost 400,000 children are said by Unicef to be traumatised and in need of psychosocial support.
    Drug addiction, mostly to powerful painkillers, is rife. “The Israelis know this,” said Awadallah.
    “So the war being waged now is designed to break our resilience – not our resistance.”
    Gaza’s mental health facilities, always rudimentary, have been crippled by the siege."

    "Awadallah explained why the young and very clever are among those most likely to kill themselves.
    “The gap between what they aspire to and what is possible is bigger than for most ordinary people,
    and waiting for the future they have prepared for, but cannot have, becomes impossible to bear.”"

    "Raji Sourani, head of the Palestinian Human Rights Centre, waited to hear if war-crimes
    charges would be heard, but was losing hope that it would happen. “Nobody speaks about
    the occupation. Nobody speaks about the victims living under occupation – it’s Israel
    who are supposed to be the victims, and they have to be protected from us. It’s Kafka"

    "One of Mohanned’s last pieces of writing was a play called Escape. Shortly before he died,
    he had made a final effort to escape. His mother said he had applied to Israel’s prestigious
    Hebrew University in Jerusalem to study literature, and had been accepted. But he was
    unable to take up the offer, because Israeli security refused him permission to leave Gaza."

    "In the weeks and months before Mohanned’s death, his despair was apparently deepened
    by the realisation that his writing could never make a difference; as he saw it, the
    Palestinian narrative was controlled by outsiders."

    "One of Mohanned’s last stories was called “The whale who locked my door with a tail”.
    The narrator has a recurring dream in which small whales visit him and try to kill themselves.
    He wakes up and wonders why whales decide to die, saying: “It is said that whales take their
    own lives when they lose their sense of direction, when they no longer know where to go.”

    "What could have been done to prevent Mohanned’s suicide, I asked?
    “Nothing,” he said. “Only being born somewhere that was not Gaza.”"
  5. Joined
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    19 May '18 21:42
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/15/she-prayed-she-would-be-martyred-gaza-parents-mourn-their-dead

    "'She prayed she would be martyred': Gaza parents mourn their dead."

    "At 14 years old, Wesal Sheikh Khalil had already made plans for her funeral.
    If Israeli troops were to shoot her during protests on the Gaza border,
    the Palestinian tee ...[text shortened]... said when asked about her plans for the future.
    “The only change is I don’t have a daughter.”"
    how to spot propaganda...

    “She thought death was better than this life,”

    " recalling a girl she described as “full of joy”."
  6. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 21:551 edit
    These stories of the lives and deaths of young Palestinians in Gaza may be moving
    (at least to the people who don't perceive Palestinians through the lens of racist dehumanization)
    and shocking to Westerners (most of them) who are very ignorant of the realities of Palestinian lives.

    These stories touch me in a way that perhaps no ignorant Westerner reading them can understand.
    The experiences of these Palestinians may be more real to me because I have heard
    other Palestinians share some of their similar or related experiences of great tragedy.
    I perceived Palestinians as equal human beings, not as the racist stereotypes of pro-Israeli propaganda.
    (And I expect many fanatical supporters of Israel to hate me for it.)

    After suffering so much for so long, how can the Palestinians bear it and go on?
    The Palestinians are a very resilient people, but far from an absolutely invulnerable people.
    When tragedy after tragedy piles up and hopelessness fills the future, then hearts begin to break.
    I know this only too well from the experiences of my own family, my own people in another time.

    In Gaza, that breaking point's being reached. Gaza may become a factory of martyrs.
    When Gaza's best and brightest young people can see no hope for their futures and hardly any
    difference between living and dying, why should they take value in being able to breathe another day?

    And when one becomes determined to end one's life--to end one's suffering--then why not make it useful?
    Why not make one's suicide a broader public action rather than just a private tragedy?
    Why not give one's chosen death a compelling vital purpose?
    In short, if an absolutely desperate Palestinian decides to take one's own life,
    then why not attempt to take as many Israeli soldiers as possible with one?

    In my view, the Palestinians have every moral right to take up arms to resist Israel's oppression.
    Even under international law (which neither Israel nor its US patron much respects),
    the Palestinians have the right to resist an illegal Israeli occupation or blockade.
    And if the supporters of Israel would like to dispute that, then there are Palestinian
    lawyers who long have been ready to make their case in a 'neutral' international court, but
    Israel has been afraid of meeting them there, accusing international courts of anti-Jewish bias.

    I wish that someday I could have watched Wesal Sheikh Khalil dance or heard Mohanned Younis
    read one of his new stories (perhaps in English, no less), but I know that day will never come.
    Sadly, they are gone now. Sadly, they soon will be followed by many more of their people.
    So let the deaths of these young Palestinians of Gaza have the only meaning that seems to count in the West.
    Let them take as many Israeli soldiers as possible with them. Only then could there be
    enough motivation for Israel and its morally blind supporters to reconsider their ways.

    These words were once said in respect of an Irishman who died on hunger strike in a British prison:
    "Nothing additional remains to be said. The volley (of gunfire) we have just heard is
    the only speech which it is proper to make above the grave of dead Fenian."
    --Michael Collins (at Thomas Ashe's funeral in Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin 1917)
  7. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 21:583 edits
    Originally posted by @mott-the-hoople
    how to spot propaganda...

    “She thought death was better than this life,”

    " recalling a girl she described as “full of joy”."
    The pro-Israeli racist troll Mott-the-Hoopie evidently regards Palestinians as subhuman,
    which seems common among Americans brainwashed by extreme pro-Israeli propaganda
    (Would not many of these Americans condone Israel's genocide of the Palestinians?)

    Mott-the-Hoopie ignores the fact that Wesal Sheikh Khalil could have been 'full of joy'
    (as described by her mother) BEFORE 'she thought death was better than this life'.

    The sneering racist troll Mott-the-Hoopie ignores the fact that other parents have described
    their white Christian children as 'full of joy' BEFORE these children took their own lives.
  8. Behind the scenes
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    19 May '18 22:58
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The pro-Israeli racist troll Mott-the-Hoopie evidently regards Palestinians as subhuman,
    which seems common among Americans brainwashed by extreme pro-Israeli propaganda
    (Would not many of these Americans condone Israel's genocide of the Palestinians?)

    Mott-the-Hoopie ignores the fact that Wesal Sheikh Khalil could have been 'full of joy'
    (as descri ...[text shortened]... ed
    their white Christian children as 'full of joy' BEFORE these children took their own lives.
    Duchess, you and Mott-the-Hoople should get together and go bowling.
  9. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    19 May '18 23:10
    Originally posted by @mchill
    Duchess, you and Mott-the-Hoople should get together and go bowling.
    The tireless racist troll Mchill shows that he regards a thread about the tragic deaths
    (movingly described) of young Palestinians as a place for his obsessive hateful trolling.
  10. Joined
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    20 May '18 00:49
    Originally posted by @mchill
    Duchess, you and Mott-the-Hoople should get together and go bowling.
    and you could hide in the corner watching while diddling your little twat.
  11. Seongnam, S. Korea
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    21 May '18 02:12
    It is interesting that the word martyr is used because I imagine that the girl has some religious background and literlaly invoked the word shahid.

    This is a highly religious word... it is not really a word appropriate for someone who we think of merely as a political martyr for an abstract, political cause.

    This illustrates a sort of natural gulf between the Westerners who support Palestine and the Palestinians themselves.
  12. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    21 May '18 02:272 edits
    Originally posted by @philokalia
    It is interesting that the word martyr is used because I imagine that the girl has some religious background and literlaly invoked the word shahid.

    This is a highly religious word... it is not really a word appropriate for someone who we think of merely as a political martyr for an abstract, political cause.

    This illustrates a sort of natural gulf between the Westerners who support Palestine and the Palestinians themselves.
    Evidently, Wesal Sheikh Khalil (age 14) was a Muslim because she was learning to read the Quran.
    Nothing further is known about what kind of Islam she was more inclined to believe or how deeply.

    Ignorant people who did not know her personally should not put words (in Arabic) into her mouth.

    "Wesal focused on her passions – playing outside in the streets and learning to read the
    Qur’an using an audio version downloaded on her mother’s phone. Reading was difficult,
    but she loved mathematics and, inspired by her favourite teacher, wanted to teach the
    subject in the future.

    Drawing was another hobby, and her mother keeps a picture of a sketch her daughter
    made for her three weeks ago in a school notebook. It shows hearts, and a dedication
    in Arabic: “The love of my soul”."

    "This illustrates a sort of natural gulf between the Westerners who support Palestine
    and the Palestinians themselves."
    --Philokalia

    Contrary to Philokalia's preferred stereotyping, many Palestinians are not devout Muslims, let alone jihadists.
    Has Philokalia ever met any Palestinians?

    In another context, Philokalia may have ignorantly stereotyped all Japanese kamikaze pilots
    as fanatical Shintoists worshipped the Emperor as divine. In fact, the kamikaze pilots
    included Christians (one of whom left behind moving letters to his mother) and atheists
    (one of whom wrote a memoir after the war).
  13. Seongnam, S. Korea
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    21 May '18 04:12
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    Evidently, Wesal Sheikh Khalil (age 14) was a Muslim because she was learning to read the Quran.
    Nothing further is known about what kind of Islam she was more inclined to believe or how deeply.

    Ignorant people who did not know her personally should not put words (in Arabic) into her mouth.

    "Wesal focused on her passions – playing outside in the st ...[text shortened]... t behind moving letters to his mother) and atheists
    (one of whom wrote a memoir after the war).
    (1) I have said it before, but my significant other is of an Islamic background and whether a person is devout or not the word 'Shahid' is very, very well known. Indeed, my girll is a Persian and while Persians even these days now often pray in Farsi it is one of those incredibly obvious words.

    But yeah, I have some familiarity with the Palestinian resistance and am not surprised that in the era of the Hamas controlled Gaza strip there is undisguised Islamic sentiment in the protests. To not be surprised would be foolish.

    Perhaps you do not know the omnipresence of the word because you do not have as much familiarity with the Islamic world as I have. I do not mean to sound pompous, but I noticed that instead of going with this observation in an informed direction you have decided to just throw up your hands.

    (2) The kamikaze reference is funny.

    I have worked on the translation of a book about a Japanese nationalist philosopher who was a devout Buddhist; I'd be the last person to assume that every Japanese nationalist Soldier was a Shintoist.

    Indeed, navigating the boundaries between Shintoist & Buddhist is often not even that easy to do.

    Indeed, the guy I worked on a bit, Kitaro Nishida, is characterized as a Nationalist and a Buddhist, and in his youth actually was greatly drawn towards Christian & Western concepts while still maintaining some degree of Japanese nationalism.
  14. Zugzwang
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    21 May '18 05:381 edit
    Originally posted by @philokalia
    (1) I have said it before, but my significant other is of an Islamic background and whether a person is devout or not the word 'Shahid' is very, very well known. Indeed, my girll is a Persian and while Persians even these days now often pray in Farsi it is one of those incredibly obvious words.

    But yeah, I have some familiarity with the Palestinian r ...[text shortened]... owards Christian & Western concepts while still maintaining some degree of Japanese nationalism.
    I am attempting to stop Westerners from imposing their gratuitous stereotypes.

    I am well-aware of the Arabic word 'šahīd'. I don't know how or if this girl used this word.
    I can say with some confidence that she would NOT have used the exact word 'šahīd'
    to refer to herself on account of grammar. The feminine form is 'šahīda'.

    Most Westerners here have obediently followed Israeli propaganda in absolutely demonizing Hamas.
    What these Westerners don't know (though I pointed it out before and Finnegan knows it)
    is that in the 1980s ISRAEL INITIALLY SECRETLY SUPPORTED HAMAS AS A RIVAL TO THE PLO.
    Israel's strategy was to divide-and-conquer the Palestinians by encouraging Hamas to
    grow stronger and then a bitter conflict to break out between Hamas and the PLO.
    This strategy was largely successful, though it had the side effect that Israel came to
    perceive Hamas as a greater military threat than the PLO. The Israelis noted that the
    captured Hamas men were tougher than PLO men when they were tortured, and the
    Israelis were frustrated when Hamas men died under torture before saying anything useful.

    My point is that Israeli propaganda lies when it claims that Israel always has done its utmost to oppose Hamas.
    The Israeli media has covered Israel's early secret support of Hamas, so this kind of
    Israeli propaganda would not work so well on Israelis as on the more ignorant Americans.
  15. Joined
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    21 May '18 10:181 edit
    Originally posted by @mott-the-hoople
    how to spot propaganda...

    “She thought death was better than this life,”

    " recalling a girl she described as “full of joy”."
    Apparently this happens in every Islamic country.

    What are the odds?

    So if life is not worth living there, where are all the Planned Parenthoods?

    Oh, that's right, they only have those in the US cuz life is so bad there.
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