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Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    05 Dec '10 17:26
    Is it an ethnic term? Political? Does it differ from "Aryan" (ethnic Iranian)?
  2. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    05 Dec '10 17:30
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Is it an ethnic term? Political? Does it differ from "Aryan" (ethnic Iranian)?
    As far as I know, the Aryan people moved down from the Caucausus (or however that's spelled on a Sunday evening) and eventually, the Aryans from Iran were known as Persians. I can only assume that it's a mingling between Aryans and the original population (which would be roughly the same as the Babylonian / Sumerian population... me reckons... which would be, semitic...).
  3. 05 Dec '10 17:49
    An Iranian.
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    05 Dec '10 17:52
    So, it means "Iranian citizen"? I don't think it does.
  5. 05 Dec '10 18:04
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    So, it means "Iranian citizen"? I don't think it does.
    According to Wikipedia "The Persian people are defined by the use of the Persian language as their mother tongue. However, the term Persian has also a supra-ethnic significance and has been historically referred to a part of Iranian peoples. The origin of the Persian people is traced to the ancient Indo-Iranians, who arrived in parts of Greater Iran circa 2000-1500 BCE. Starting around 550 BCE, from the region of Persis in southern Iran, encompassing the present Fars province, the ancient Persians spread their language and culture to other parts of the Iranian plateau through conquest and assimilated local Iranic and non-Iranic groups over time. This process of assimilation continued in the face of Greek, Arab, Mongol and Turkic invasions and continued right up to Islamic times."
  6. 05 Dec '10 18:20
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    So, it means "Iranian citizen"? I don't think it does.
    Ofcourse it does not mean an Iranian citizen. Any fool knows that! Barring KazetNagorra ofcourse.
  7. 05 Dec '10 23:07
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    So, it means "Iranian citizen"? I don't think it does.
    Surely the use of the term "Persian" now is politically charged. Iranians or those of Iranian descent often use it in preference to "Iranian" to distance themselves from the Islamic Republic of Iran. But traditionally I think that "Persian" has often been used to refer to cultural phenomena; thus one speaks of Persian cuisine or Persian art; and the language is Persian, not Iranian. This is kind of logical, since the sphere of Persian culture exceeds the borders of modern-day Iran; the Tajiks, who form the dominant ethnic group in Tajikistan, a substantial one in Afghanistan, and a minority in Uzbekistan, are linguistically and culturally Persian.
  8. Standard member joneschr
    Some guy
    06 Dec '10 23:58 / 3 edits
    Weird, I just ran into this this afternoon. I had business lunch with someone - and she told me she was "from Persia".

    I'm used to people calling themselves "Persian" but the same people would ordinarily say "from Iran".

    In response, I asked her "from Iran?" and she said her family left "Persia" and so she was "from Persia". It was a business lunch, she didn't seem to appreciate the response (even though she volunteered that she was "from Persia" ), and I didn't really want to press the issue, and changed the subject, but it struck me as unusual.

    I mean, the country didn't even change names alongside the Islamic revolution, right? It changed back in the 30s as I understood it?

    Is it common for people to say they're actually "from Persia"? Is that how people who left before the Islamic revolution identify the country? Or are people in the states just so afraid of identifying with Iran than they're starting to re-label themselves?
  9. 07 Dec '10 00:22
    It's a type of cat
  10. Standard member RevRSleeker
    CerebrallyChallenged
    07 Dec '10 01:49 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by CliffLandin
    According to Wikipedia "The Persian people are defined by the use of the Persian language as their mother tongue. However, the term Persian has also a supra-ethnic significance and has been historically referred to a part of Iranian peoples. The origin of the Persian people is traced to the ancient Indo-Iranians, who arrived in parts of Greater Iran c ...[text shortened]... face of Greek, Arab, Mongol and Turkic invasions and continued right up to Islamic times."
    I was intrigued with the wiki definition but I'll add my two penneth..I'd be quite happy to make the definition of Persian as 'Persian speaker,' a mother tongue...its ethnic significance relates to before the make up of the modern Iran, pre early 1900's and their further signifances post revolution in '79, I think 60 odd % speak either the Old or the major branches of Persian, the rest made up of many 'factions' whether that be Turk types, Kurd, Arab types and others. I think it fair to say the concensus agree three ancient main groups formed what is seen as making of Persia old, the Parsians, the Parthia(eo)ns and the Medians ( 'Indo-Iranian' ?? ), their differentiation being there are documents \ ornamentations indicating of aryan race, whether this is not some form of observance to post conquering by Greece ( Alexander the Great ) I'm not sure..I'm sure someone may mention 'Zoroastrians' they think as Persian, they were but were 'second dynasty.' The last true Persian king, including Zoroasrians, was in the 7th century A.D. Many modern day Persians, and scholars, have great faith and sentimentality for the 'Avesta,' what can still be observed from the holy book of Zoroastrianism. 'Indo-Iranian,' I won't argue with 'wiki' but a relatively modern term and regionally correct'ish, the dates also'ish but B.C and A.D are perfectly understandable and were universally adopted, with some noted non observances, some 1700yrs ago.... I dislike the way important aspects of Ancient History are watered down by considerations of modern 'pc.' Then again, what do I know...mere observations of, and from, one person to another. EDIT: What have I missed
  11. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    09 Dec '10 05:16
    It's the opposite of a Brazilian.
  12. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    09 Dec '10 05:17
    Originally posted by joneschr

    Is it common for people to say they're actually "from Persia"? Is that how people who left before the Islamic revolution identify the country? Or are people in the states just so afraid of identifying with Iran than they're starting to re-label themselves?
    Maybe it's like people still calling themselves Rhodesians.
  13. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    09 Dec '10 16:25
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Maybe it's like people still calling themselves Rhodesians.
    I just looked up Cecil Rhodes. Another Germanic supremacist. He wanted the British Empire, USA and Germany to unite and rule the world.
  14. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    10 Dec '10 01:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Is it an ethnic term? Political? Does it differ from "Aryan" (ethnic Iranian)?
    What the hell does it matter?
  15. 10 Dec '10 01:58
    Originally posted by Siskin
    It's a type of cat
    Or a type of rug.